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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



SCHOOL REPORT 



AND 



I OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 



FOR THE 



Year Ending February 28, 189^ 



LOWELL, MASS. 

COURIER-CITIZEN COMPANY, PRINTERS. 
1895. 



Officers of the Town of Chelmsford for 1894. 



[An asterisk against a name indicates that the person did not qualify.] 

Selectmen, Assessors, and Overseers of the Poor — P^ben T. Adams, 

George F. Snow, Martin Robbins, Newell E. Parker, 

Arthur H. Sheldon. 
Town Clerk — George A. Parkhurst. 
Town Treasurer — Ervin W. Sweetser. 

Auditors — Ziba Gay, Edward F. Richardson, Perley P. Perham. 
School Committee — Three years: Samuel Hagerman, Orrin 

Pierce, Charles F. Randlett ; two years : Daniel P. Byam, 

John H. Redman, Charles H. Andrews; one year: George 

A. Byam, Hubert Bearce, Joseph A. Parkhurst. 
Constables — James P. Emerson, Fred E. Nason, David A. Pol- 

lky, John H. Whidden, George F. Dyar*, James H. McFar- 

lin*, Charles S. Carter, William J. Quigley. 
Trustees of Public Library — Three years: A. Heady Park, Miss 

Louisa A. Allen; two years: Mrs. Harriet M. Bartlett, 

Luther H. Sargent; one year: Henry S. Perham, S. Inger- 

soll Briant. 
Collector of Taxes — William L. Gordon. 
Fence Viewers — James P. Emerson, Albion J. Lamphere*, 

Daniel P. Byam. 
Appraisers of Personal Property at the Town Farm — James P. 

Emerson, Daniel P. Byam, James S. Wotton. 
Weighers oj Hay — Marcus H. Winship, Eben T. Adams, Elisha 

H. Shaw, James P. Emerson, Daniel W. Bickford, Henry H. 

Emerson*, S. Waldo Parkhurst, George W. Proctor. 
Measurers of Wood — S. Waldo Parkhurst, George W. Proctor, 

Newell E. Parker, Elisha H. Shaw, James P. Emerson*, 

Marcus H. Winship, Daniel A. Reardon. 
Surveyors oj Lumber — R. Wilson Dix, Newell E. Parker, 

Edwin K. Parkhurst*, George E. Spaulding*, E. Lincoln 

Russell, Myron A. Queen. 
Field Drivers — Fred L. Fletcher, Aleck J. Park, David A. 

Polley. 

appointed by the selectmen : 

Superintendent of Streets — Daniel W. Lane. 
Sealer of Weights and Measures — True Morton. 



Weighers of Coal — S. Waldo Parkhurst, Geo. W. Proctor, 

Daniel W. Bickford, Marcus H. Winship, Myron A. Queen, 

Elisha H. Shaw. 
Superintendent of Town Farm — Eben T. Adams. 
Superintendents of Burials — L. K. Howard, John H. Whidden 

(deceased), Daniel P. Byam, Arthur H. Sheldon, Alfred 

G. Parkhurst. 
Superintendent of Burials of Indigent Soldiers — L. K. Howard. 
Inspector of Animals Kept for Slaughter — Edwin C. Periiam. 
Fire Wards — Myron A. Queen, C. F. Scribner, George W. 

Chamberlain, Ai.mon W. Holt, Daniel P. Byam, Marcus H. 

Winship, John O'Connor, Frank C. Byam, Warren Berry. 
Forest Fire Wards — Amos B. Adams, Charles H. Holt, Warren 

Berry, George F. Snow. 
Fish Warden — Everett F. Small. 

Special Police Officers — Thomas C. Mooney (appointment re- 
voked), George F. Dyar, James H. McFarlin. 
Special Police Without Pay From Toivn — John H. Nichols, 

George C. Moore, Eben T. Adams, Charles Andrews, 

Thomas Brown. 
Janitors of Public Buildings — John H. Nichols, Centre Town 

Hall ; William J. Quigley, North Village. 
Registrars of Voters — Lewis M. Ddtton, Chairman; Stewart 

MacKay, John F. McManomin, George A. Parkhurst, 

Clerk, ex-officio. 
Precinct Wardens — (1) Warren Berry, (2) Charles H. Dutton, 

(3) Eugene W. S. Dutton. 
Deputy Wardens — (1) Walter Perham, (2) William J. Quigley, 

(3) Edwin F. Coburn. 
Precinct Clerks — (1) Joseph E. Warren, (2) Fred K. Ripley, 

(3) Marcus H. Winship. 
Deputy Clerks — (1) John H. Redman, (2) Charles H. Holt, 

(3) Joseph A. Parkhurst. 
Inspectors — (1) Almon W. Holt, Arthur M. Warren; (2) 

George Hyde, Hubert Bearce ; (3) Alfred G. Parkhurst, 

Joseph G. Quessey. 
Deputy Inspectors — (1) Daniel P. Byam, Robert S. Ross; (2) 

John C. Hobbs, John C. McEnaney ; (3) Samuel Naylor, 

John J. Quessey. 
Librarian — Rev. H. A. Cornell. 



Report of the Town Clerk 

For tfie Year Ending February 28, 1895. 



BIRTt 

Males ... 35 

Females 33 

Total 68 

Increase over 1893 

Births of Dative parentage . « 

Births of foreign parentage 30 

Births of native and foreign parentage 17 

Note. — Births occurring late in the year are sometimes 
returned without the Christian name In all such cases parents 
should return the name to the Town Clerk as soon as selected, as an 
incompleteness of the record may involve much trouble m the future. 

MARRIAG 

Whole number 25 

Between natives 11 

Between foreigners 5 

Between natives and foreigners 9 

msford grooms 15 

Chelmsford br'nles 13 

Solemnized in Chelmsford 15 

Solemnized in Lowell 6 

One each in Sornerville, J>aeo, Me.. Westford and Lawrence.. 4 

Less than in 1 893 II 

DEATHS. 
Date. Yrt. Mos. Daps. 

Jan. 10. Sarah Blood " 

12. Betsey A. Dearborn 81 5 28 

20. Bartholomew 0"N« i. 

21. Cornelia F. Dobbin 45 10 

24. George Morton 68 5 12 

31. Bernard Finnegan . 10 

31. Johanna Sheehan. 



6 



Date. 
Feb. 2. 

2. 

6. 

March 4. 

11. 

16. 

17. 

April 29. 

May 11. 

June 8. 

10. 

13. 

20. 

21. 

1. 
15. 
15. 

5. 

8. 
25. 

2. 
13. 
13. 
15. 

6. 
14. 
18. 
18. 

2. 

3. 

6. 

8. 

9. 
17. 



July 



Auff. 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Name. Trs. Mos. Days. 

Agnes Mooney 3 14 

Huth VV. Smith 76 

Mary Mahoney 63 

George B. A. Holt 19 1 

Catherine E. Shields 10 

John R. Churchill 77 

Eliza T. Dean 82 2 17 

Hannah A. Shields 17 1 5 

Daniel A. Brown 56 

Henry McCabe 62 

James Holland 36 

Ellen Keenan 33 

P^ugene McEnnis 4 21 

Alfred Dav 68 2 15 

Gerritt J.Bradt 40 11 26 

Sarah E. Stone 74 4 21 

Lillie May Sweat 17 6 20 

Emma L. Blanc 3 4 

John H. Whidden 51 1 

Francis J. Burns 

Walter C. McCoy 2 

Jane L. Copp 40 

Stearns L. Ripley 67 11 17 

Annie Devitt 13 11 6 

Benjamin M. Hildreth 68 4 12 

Isabelle Smith 46 

J. Baptiste Tredeau 48 . . 24 

William H. Brown 68 .. 9 

William Toye 94 

Fred Hodgson 7 

Ann E. Marshall 61 11 17 

Ellen M. stackpole 50 

George W. Streeter 37 8 a 

McEnnis (Infantile.) 



Males, 22; females, 19; total, 41 
Less than in 1893, 23. 



DOG LICENSES. 



Number of dogs licensed 247 

Males 229 

Females 18 

Amount received for licenses $548 00 

Amount of fees, 20 cents per license 49 40 

Paid to the Counts Treasurer as per receipts on file 498 60 

96£ per cent, refunded 481 15 

GEORGE A. PARK HURST, 

Town Clerk. 



Report of Town Treasurer 

For the Tear Ending February 28, 1895. 



Your Treasurer charges himself with cash received as 

follows : Of 
Edwin H. Warren, as balance in treasury at last 

annual settlement $ 636 28 

State Treasurer (at hand of E. H. Warren) on account 

of Corporation tax for 1893... . 354 96 

(at hand of E. H. Warren) on 
account of temporary support of 

State paupers 90 75 

on account of temporal support of 

State paupers 841 

on account of Corporation tax for 

1894 1135 42 

on account of National Bank tax 

for 1894 1018 42 

on account of Military aid 64 00 

on account of State aid 862 00 

on account of burial of Indigent 

Sailors and Soldiers 17 50 

on account of Armory rent 300 00 

on account of income Massachusetts 

School Fund 293 45 

County Treasurer, on account of dog licenses for 1894 481 15 

Count} 7 Treasurer, as award for land damage 1300 00 

Matthias Hutchins, on account of hospital bills 169 48 

City of Somerville, on account of aid to paupers 119 00 

City of Lowell, on account of aid to paupers 58 50 

Chas. Andrews, on account of tuition of non-resident 

pupils 9 00 

Jerusha J. Shed, as a fund, the income to be used for 
the care of the John Park hurst lots in the 

cemetery at Chelmsford Centre 100 00 

E. H. Shaw, agent, dividend on insurance policy in 

Traders and Mechanics Insurance Company 42 00 

City Institution for Savings, interest on Edwards fund 6 02 
Town of Billerica, on account of surveying, and set- 
ting bounds on town liue 11 75 

A. G. Parkhurst, on account of sale of lots in ceme- 
tery at West Chelmsford 5 00 

Amount carried forward $7,083 09 



Amount brought forward $7,083 09 

Lowell and Suburban Street R. R. Co., on account of 

grading road and widening Lowell road 225 00 

Chelmsford Lodge, I. O. O. F., for use of Town Hall 

(Centre) 93 50 

John H. Nichols, on account of rent of Town Hall 

(Centre) 134 75 

Wm. J. Quigley, on account of rent of Town Hall 

(North Chelmsford) 15 00 

Eben T. Adams, on account of sale of manure at 

Town Hall stable 2 00 

on account of sale of parts of old 

hearse 1 00 

on account of slaughter-house licenses 6 00 

on account of sale of sand to Horace 

Holt 2 50 

Overseers of Poor, as proceeds of Town Farm 1,754 54 

H. A. Cornell, Librarian, on account of sale of 

catalogues 4 50 

on account of fines collected for 

keeping books overtime 9 58 

Arthur H. Sheldon, on account of sale of lots in ceme- 
tery at North Chelmsford 35 50 

on account of sale of hay from 

cemetery at North Chelmsford 4 00 

on account of paint and oil 
returned to C. B. Coburn & 

Co. (school -house job) 4 24 

D. P. Byam, on account of sale of lots in cemetery at 

South Chelmsford 5 50 

on account of tuition of non-resident 

pupil C 50 

L. K. Howard, on account of sale of lots in Centre 

Cemetery 27 00 

on account of sale of hay from Centre 

Cemetery I 12 00 

Geo. F. Snow, on account of sale of school books and 

supplies 53 75 

Cash received on account of taxes as follows : Of 

William L. Gordon, tax of 1892 in full 610 48 

as interest on same «... 73 14 

on account of tax of 1893 2,176 63 

as interest on same 132 01 

on account of tax of 1894 14,344 67 

as interest on same 83 06 

Cash hired for use of Town, as temporary loan 6,000 00 

Making a total of $32,899 94 



9 



And is credited as follows : 



By cash paid State tax for 1894 $ 1 ,680 00 

County tax for 1894 1,837 27 

For care of Kimball lot in Centre Ceme- 
tery 5 00 

For care of Emerson lot in Centre Ceme- 
tery 5 00 

For care of Marshall lot in Centre Ceme- 
tery 5 00 

For care of Edwards and Howard lots 

in Cemetery at Morth Chrlmsford. . 4 25 
Orders drawn for the municipal year of 

1894 23,123 83 

Temporary loan in full 6,000 00 

as interest on same 128 99 

Balance in treasury as found on settlement 110 60 

$32,899 94 



E. W. SWEETSER, Treasurer 
Chelmsford, March 4, 1S95. 



Report of the Assessors 

For the Tear Ending February 28, 1895. 



Valuation May 1, 1894. 

Real estate (resident) $1 ,463,385 00 

Real estate (non-resident) 227,960 00 

$1,691,345 00 

Personal estate (resident) $260,825 00 

Personal estate (non-resident) 2,915 00 

$263,740 00 

Total valuation of assessed estate $1,955,085 00 

Rate of taxation $8 50 per $1,000.00 
Polls $2.00 

Number of polls 884 

assessed on polls only 307 
assessed on property 1,047 

Total number assessed. 1,354 

Number of horses assessed. . 584 
cows assessed .. . 1,026 
sheep assessed ... 1 

swine assessed . . 172 
fowl assessed... 12,277 
dwellings asses'd 720 
acres of land ass'd 14,219 
Valuation of buildings $932,085.00 
land 759,260.00 

Taxes. 

Statetax $1,680 00 

Couutytax. 1,837 27 

Appropriation for public schools 6,000 00 

text-books and sup- 
plies 600 00 

Amount carried forward $10,117 27 



11 

Amount brought forward $10,117 27 

Appropriation for school incidentals. 350 00 

school apparatus.. 125 00 

support of poor... 2,000 00 

highways 5,000 00 

repairs of public 
buildings 600 00 

relief of indigent 
soldiers and sail- 
ors 100 00 

Town officers and 

committees..... 1,100 00 

collection and abate- 
ment of taxes. .. 500 00 

enforcement of liq- 
uor law 100 00 

care of cemeteries.. 200 00 

village clock 30 00 

public library 250 00 

miscellaneous exp's 300 00 

North Chelmsford 

Library Asso.... 200 00 

bell for school-house 

No. 8 150 00 

Memorial day 50 00 

heating apparatus, 

school No. 8 500 00 

transcribing ancient 

town records. ... 165 00 

preparing military 
records of Chelms- 
foid soldiers 47 00 

reimbursing caval'y 17 00 

$21,901 27 

Overlayings 1 3 95 

$21,915 22 
Less estimated receipts 2,800 00 

$19,115 22 
Less appropriations from treasury... 729 00 



Total tax committed $18,386 22 

$18,386 22 



Tax on 884 polls $ 1,768 00 

Tax on property 16,618 22 



12 



MISCELLANEOUS CHANGES IN THE STATE THE PAST YEAR. 

The valuation of buildings has increased $36,156,668 00 

land has increased 23,034,519 00 

Total real estate increase $59,191,187 00 

The valuation of personal estate has decreased. ... 16,008,711 00 



Total increase of assessed estate $43,182,476 00 

Number of horses assessed 193,433 

cows assessed 182,477 

sheep assessed 44.608 

swine assessed 35,603 

fowl assessed 779,938 

dwelling houses assessed .... 394, 1 87 

acres of land assessed 4,502,585 

Increase in number of horses 2,255 

Decrease in number of cows 4,329 

sheep 1 ,545 

Increase in number of swine 7,732 

Decrease in number of fowl 100,541 

Increase in number of dwelling houses. . 10,474 
Decrease in number of acres of land. . .. 6,360 

Average rate of tax, $14.80 on $1,000. 

Highest rate, $25.00 on $1,000, in town of Savoy, County of 
Berkshire. 

Lowest rate, $4.60 on $1,000, in town of Gosnold, County of 
Dukes. 

There are 30 cities and 322 towns. 

No cities and but 18 towns have a less tax rate than Chelms- 
ford. 

GEO. F. SNOW, 
EBEN T. ADAMS, 
MARTIN ROBBINS, 
NEWELL E. PARKER, 
ARTHUR H. SHELDON, 

Assessors. 



Collector's Report. 



Collector's Report for 1892. 
Taxes on list of 1892 uncollected Feb. 28, 

1894 $610 48 

Interest on same to Feb. 28, 1894 42 69 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1894 30 45 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax $610 48 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as interest 73 14 



$683 62 



$683 C2 



WILLIAM L. GORDON, Collector. 



Collector's Report for 1893. 
Taxes on list of 1893 uncollected Feb. 28, 

1894 $3,123 77 

Uncollected interest Feb. 28, 1894 91 13 

Accrued interest since Feb. 28, 1894 134 79 

$3,349 69 



Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax $2,1 76 63 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as interest 132 01 

Uncollected taxes to new account 947 14 

Uncollected interest to new account 93 91 



$3,349 69 



WILLIAM L. GORDON, Collector. 



Collector's Report for 1894. 

Taxes on list of 1894 $18,386 22 

Additional taxes 71 22 

Interest collected since Oct. 1 , 1894 83 06 

Accrued interest on uncollected taxes 1 19 98 

$18,660 48 



14 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax $14,344 67 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as interest 83 06 

Uncollected taxes to new account 4,112 77 

Accrued interest to new account 119 98 

$18.6*50 48 



WILLIAM L. GORDON, Collector. 



Report of the Selectmen 

For the Year Ending Feb. 28, 1895. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

PAID FOR TEACHING. 



No. 1, Susie M. Emerson, 36 weeks $684 00 

1, Susie S. McFarlin,36 weeks 378 00 

1 , Carrie L. Adams, 1 7 weeks 1 53 00 

1 , Alice G. Wheeler, 34 weeks 306 00 

1, Frances Clark, 19 weeks 171 00 $1,692 00 

2, Daisy Hadley, 36 weeks 288 00 288 00 

3, Gertrude Stiles, 4 weeks school year 

1893 34 00 

3, Belle B. Hadley, 24 weeks. 204 00 

3, Helen G. Fulton, 12 weeks 102 00 340 00 

4, Helen M. Osgood, 33 1-7 weeks 282 20 

4, Grace I. Washburn, 2 4-7 weeks.. ... 23 80 306 00 

5, Grace E. Mansfield, 36 weeks , . . 288 00 288 00 

6, Helen E. Gookin, 36 weeks 348 00 348 00 

8, Arthur W. Trubey, 36 weeks 756 00 

8, Laura G. Hoyt, 36 weeks 324 00 

8, Winnifred Miller, 12 weeks 108 00 

8, Fannie Voter, 24 weeks 216 00 

8, Nellie M. Baker, 25 2-7 weeks 228 60 

8, Jennie McKenzie, 10| weeks 92 70 1,725 30 

9, Ella A. Hutchinson, 12 weeks 108 00 

9, Carrie E. Erskine, 24 weeks 216 00 

9, Agnes Naylor, 36 weeks 324 00 648 00 



$5,635 30 

CARE OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

No. 1 , Jasper Elliott, care $ 90 00 

1 , Mrs. Kelley, cleaning 8 25 $ 98 25 

2, Walter J. Smith, care 5 00 

2, David Kelley, care 11 00 

2, Mis. J. T. Smith, cleaning 3 00 19 00 



Amount carried forward $1 17 25 



16 



Amount brought forward. 

No. 3, Russell George, care 

3, John B. Emerson, care 

3, Daniel P. Byam, cleaning. 

3, Arthur Hunt, care 

4, Frank Melvin, care , 

4, Walter H. Redman, care. . 

4, M. A. Hatch, cleaning. . . . 

5, George A. Byam, Jr., care 

6, Lizzie C. Devine, care- 

6, Gertie Barris, care 

6, Orrin Pierce, cleaning 

8, Gardner Ripley, care 

8, Gardner Ripley, cleaning... 

8, Chris Clausen, cleaning. ... 

9, John Knowles, care 

9, J. A. Parkkurst, cleaning. . 



SCHOOL FUEL. 



$117 25 



$6 00 






13 20 






3 00 






6 75 


28 


95 


6 00 






12 25 






4 00 


. 22 


25 


14 00 


14 


00 


6 00 






12 00 






3 00 


21 


00 


08 00 






3 50 






2 50 


114 


00 


30 45 






4 95 


35 


40 



$352 85 



No. 1, Harry L. Parkhurst. 44,190 lbs. coal. 

1, E. T. Adams, Superintendent Town 

Farm, 1 cord prepared wood.... 

2, J. Bowers, 62 feet wood 

2, J. Bowers, preparing wood 

3, Daniel P. Byam, 5 cords prepared 

wood 

3, Howard Park, J cord prepared wood. 

3, N. B. Lapham, \ cord wood 

4, E. L. Russell, k l\ cords slab wood. . . 
4, John H. Redman, 3 cords wood 

4, John H. Redman, housing same 

5, Geo. A. Byam, 8 cords wood 

5, Geo. A. Byam, housing wood 

6, T. S. Edmands, 2 cords oak wood.. . 
6, Michael McKenned}', preparing wood 
8, Chelmsford Foundry Co., 2360 coal.. 
8, C. A. Vinal, 1 cord wood 

8, Gardner K. Riplej 7 , 20 cords wood... 

9, Ira G. George, preparing 10 cords 

wood 

9, Charles Jordan, housing wood 



$144 62 



6 50 


$151 12 


36 50 




15 50 


52 00 


32 50 




2 50 




1 75 


36 75 


9 15 




19 50 




1 25 


29 90 


52 00 




2 00 


54 00 


11 00 




2 00 


13 00 


7 08 




4 25 




5 00 


16 33 


I. 00 




2 00 


7 00 



$360 10 



17 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 



Geo. F. Snow, Superintendent $200 00 

E. Shaw & Son, supplies for evening school, 

1893-94 18 15 

E. Shaw & Son, supplies 21 72 

John H. Redman, Secretary of School Board 10 00 

expenses 1 21 

setting glass, etc 54 

supplies 1 30 

S. W. Park hurst, supplies 17 2(5 

Emerson & Co., supplies 1 30 

Bartlett & Dow, supplies 4 57 

Jasper Elliott, supplies 7 25 

J . A. Parkhurst, supplies 25 

H. H. Wilder, supplies 42 

Adams & Co. , supplies 12 25 

John Knowles, supplies 80 

W. A. Mack, Champion stove 8 50 

F. C. Byam, freight 25 

Seth P. Sampson, use of well 8 00 

Fanny Voter, cash paid for repairing chair.. 40 

J. H. Howard, three outside windows 

Susie M. Emerson, waste baskets, etc 4 60 

Grace E. Mansfield, covering for desk 1 47 

Geo. A. Byam, labor and supplies 11 85 

Gardner K. Ripley, labor 50 

Orrin Pierce, labor 5 00 

S. Hagerman, labor 

F. G. Pratt, labor 4 00 

Edwin E. Sweetser, labor 50 

A. G. Parkhurst, labor 1 90 

Michael Harrington, labor 1 00 

J. Clark Osterhout, labor 75 



$200 0G 
39 87 

13 05. 



43 30 



17 95 
4 50 

6 07 



17 35 
32 85 



8 15 



SCHOOL TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 



$383 09 



D. C. Heath & Co., books $ 17 09 

J. L. Hammett, books and supplies 1 75 50 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books 30 94 

Educational Co., books 1 67 

John E. Potter and Co., books 16 50 

Ginn & Co., books 87 51 

Wm. M. Sargent, books and supplies 1 28 53 

Silver, Burdett & Co. , books 6 1 40 

Geo. F. King & Merrill, books 8 00 

Amount carried forward $527 14 



18 



Amount brought forward $527 14 

Porter & Coates, books 8 SO 

Leach, Shewell & Sanborn, books 16 00 

Edward E. Babb, books and supplies 8 80 

American Book Co., books 16 05 

Lee & Shepard , books 12 14 

The Werner Co., books 29 60 

N. E. Publishing Co., books 1 60 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co. , books 334 

Thompson, Brown & Co., books and supplies 24 58 

Bartlett & Dow, supplies 1 20 

American Express Co.. express on books. . . 17 62 
Geo. F. Snow, services and expenses in 

buying and delivering books and supplies 50 00 



$716 87 



SCHOOL APPARATUS. 

Prang Ed. Co $23 04 

Bartlett & Dow, two bells 1 10 

Thomas Hall & Son, App. and supplies. ... 
Strobridge Lithographing Co., 25 diplomas. 

W. H. Spalding, hartshorn bottle 

Talbot Dye wood Co., chemicals. 

American Book Co., dictionaries 

University Publishing Co.. dictionaries 

D. H. Knowlton, books 

Derby & Morse, 4 packages Sal 

Carleton & Hovey, alcohol, etc 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 



EXPENSES OUTSIDE OF ALMSHOUSE. 



20 90 




8 75 




25 




1 30 


$55 34 


17 00 




10 00 




5 00 




32 




1 35 


33 67 



$89 01 



Worcester Insane Asylum in aid of Daniel 

Gilligan \ $169 46 

Ella Hutchins 169 47 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, aid to James 

W. Dunn 39 00 

St. John's Hospital, aid to Thomas Lawton.. 

Danvers Lunatic Hospital, aid to Mrs. 
Catherine McMahon 

Westborough Insane Hospital, aid to Benj. 

F. Worden 5107 

Amount carried forward 



$338 93 

39 00 
104 27 

169 45 



$651 65 



i 



19 
Amount brought forward $651 65 

Laura E. Bailey 

James W. Dunn 

orthampton Lunatic Hospital, aid to Laura 



?rr." E. Bailey. 
Taunton Lunatic Hospital, aid to P21i B. Kit- 

tredge 

City of Salem, aid to Fred E. Ward and family 
City of Lowell, aid to Fred E. Russell and 

family 

E. T. Adams, aid to Rufus G. Hildreth and 

family 

James O'Neil and others 

E. Shaw & Son, aid to state paupers 

Peter Lumbert, aid to state paupers 

Seth P. Sampson, aid to state paupers 

Dr. F. W. Pike, aid to state paupers 

Mary C. Worden, aid to B. F. Worden 

M. H. Winship, aid to James W. Boynton. . 

Dr. E. H. Chamberlain, aid to tramp 

Dr. E. H. Chamberlain, aid to W. J. Woods 

and family 

D. W. Bickford, aid to W. J. Woods and 

family 

Dutton Bros., aid to Geo. W. Chamberlain 
and family 

James P. Emerson, aid to Geo. W. Chamber- 
lain and family 

S. W. Parkhurst, aid to Geo. W. Chamber- 
lain and family 

Dr. A. Howard, aid to Geo. W. Chamber- 
lain and family 

H. L. Parkhurst, aid to Geo. W. Chamber- 
lain and family 

E. W. Sweetser, aid to Geo. W. Chamber- 

lain and family 

H. M. Chamberlain, aid to Geo. W. 
Chamberlain and family 

Dr. G. A. Harlow, aid to James W. Boyn- 
ton 



EXPENSES AT ALMSHOUSE. 

S. H. Nason, services as Superintendent for 

March , 31 25 



132 33 




130 46 


313 86 


39 79 


39 79 




46 43 




111 45 




4 00 


16 35 




3 79 


20 14 




26 45 




1 75 




6 57 




10 00 




64 00 




96 00 


1 50 




22 00 


23 50 




16 08 




7 22 




2 50 




8 03 




10 50 




3 00 




12 05 




10 00 




5 00 




$1,489 97 



Amount carried forward • $31 25 



20 

Amount brought forward, $ 31 25 

E. T. Adams, 11 months services as Super- 
intendent 343 Ih 

E. W. Sweetser, provisions 331 45 

T. Adams, provisions 7 32 

L. W. Hall & Co., provisions 2 92 

Hall, Perham & Co., provisions 3 12 13 36 

S. W. Parkhurst, groceries 180 42 

C. H. Wing, groceries 112 74 

Caleb L. Smith, groceries * . . 15 40 

W. H. Brown, groceries, 1893 26 03 334 59 

Dickson Bros., tea and coffee, 1893 1 70 

Nichols & Co., tea and coffee 20 83 

U. S. Tea Co., tea 1 30 23 83 

L. G. Morse, crackers 11 12 

T. F. Severance, crackers 14 75 25 87 

Hiram C. Blackmer, cutting wood, 1893 26 20 

Hiram C. Blackmer, labor, 1893 37 57 63 77 

John P. Eaton, labor 9 00 

Mrs. Sanderson, labor 4 31 

Geo. Haynes, labor 1 80 

Vina M/Nason, labor 119 00 

Orena Webster, labor 11 80 

Sumner Crosby, labor 1 8 00 

Geo. Hall, labor 3 00 

Joseph O'Day, labor 16 50 

Nels Nelson, labor 15 00 198 41 

J. J. Cluin, repairing clock, 1893 1 00 

James Stanley, repairing clock 1 00 

Dutton Bros. , grain 385 70 

Dutton Bros, ice 31 25 

D. W. Bickford, grain 30 51 449 46 

J. B. Hoar, bread 2 29 

H. L. Knowlton, apples 25 

Dutton Bros. , lumber 1 22 

Dutton Bros. , grass seed 1 39 

Paine's Furniture Co., 7 iron bedsteads 31 50 36 65 

Harry L. Parkhurst, freight and express... . 1 72 

Adams & Co. , supplies 28 82 

Geo. M. Wright, blacksmithing 9 73 

J. dishing, 6 barrels flour 22 05 

Dr. E. II . Chamberlin, medicine 1 75 

Bartlett & Dow 10 63 74 70 

Wm. S. Pierce, filing saws 1 05 

J. L. Chalifoux, clothing 5 50 

T. M. Bolton, supplies 11 25 

Amount carried forward $1,927 09 



21 

Amount brought forward Si ,927 09 

French & Puffer, crockery $ 

C. B. Coburn & Co., supplies 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., towels 

S. C. Patrick, tobacco 

Ellingwood & Co., disinfectant 

Cook, Taylor & Co., supplies 

Green & Co., shoes and boots , 

Armour & Co. , butter 

H. F. Ebert, straps 

Consumers Brewing Co. , grains 

Hamilton Print Works, prints 

Thomas H. Lawler, stamp 

Jalmar Karlson, repairs 

A. W, Ober, horseradish 

Mr. Chrisholm, settee 

P. H. Foote, hat 

Geo. W. Chamberlain, labor 

E. N. Woods, grass seeds 

Thompson Hardware Co., supplies 

A. Kimball, animal food 

John Keats, dressing hogs 

Knox & Carleton, fruit jars 

E. H . Warren, grass 

Wm. H. Hills, medicine 

Albert Slade, soldering 

E. A. Harmon, supplies 

Putnam & Son, clothing 

O'Donnell & Gilbride, dry goods 

C. Vayo, peaches ••••... 

M. G. Mack, poison 

William H. Clinton, fish 

A. L. Butman, harness dressing 

John H. Nichols, corn fodder 

W. A. Ingham, butter and beans 

U.S. Perham, 1 cow 

M. Rozen, 1 pair pants 

Talbot Mills, flannel 

Harry L. Park hurst, coal 

Worthen & Lovering, cotton waste 

Arthur M. Warren, use of bull 

Geo. E. Emerson, use of bull 

John H. Breed, cutting hair, 1893 

A. G. Pollard, dry goods 

Patrick Sullivan, cutting wood 

L. S. Franklin, team plowing 

Amount carried forward 



21 65 




3 28 




1 50 


44 23 


40 




1 15 




14 15 




11 15 


26 85 


36 03 


36 03 


1 25 




44 00 


45 25 


78 




50 




2 00 




1 03 




1 50 


5 81 


25 




63 




2 03 




1 65 




1 25 




5 25 




70 


11 76 


3 50 


3 50 


11 23 


11 23 


25 




45 




11 00 




1 52 


13 22 


1 35 




25 


1 60 


21 92 


21 92 


40 




1 00 




29 43 


30 83 


40 00 




1 00 




2 75 


43 75 


21 16 




5 00 


26 16 


2 00 




1 50 


3 50 


1 00 




9 37 




23 33 




6 75 


40 45 




$2,293 18 



22 



Amount brought forward $2,293 18 

E. B. Rose, 100 poles 80 

Geo. Coburn, straw 60 

J. P. Emerson, 2 shoals 12 00 

Lowell Rubber Co., rubber bands 70 

C. H. Baldwin, fish, 1893 3 13 

Farrell & Conaton, pipe 54 

Lowell Steam Carpet Co., renovating beds. 12 50 30 27 

C. W. Livingston, soap 9 16 

Lowell One Price Clothing Co., clothing. ... 70 

Washington Pharmacy, poison 25 

Mrs. Richardson, strawberries 1 . 33 

Emerson Bros., fruit 3 03 

Hazen Bros. , berries 90 15 37 

P. H. Knight, repairing wagon 3 25 

W. H. Ward, repairing wagon 50 3 75 

E. T. Adams, use of horse 29 00 

W. R. Fowle, eggs for hatching . . .< 1 50 30 50 

Martin Robbins, services and expenses as 

Overseer 46 40 

Newell E. Parker, services and expenses as 

Overseer 9 75 

Geo. F. Snow, services and expenses as 

Overseer 10 00 

A. H. Sheldon, services and expenses as 

Overseer 32 67 98 82 

$2,471 89 
Proceeds of Town Farm 1 ,754 54 

Total expense at Almshouse $71 7 35 

Paid for outside poor. $1 ,489 97 

Received on account of outside poor : 

Mathias Hutchins on account ofhospital bills $169 48 

City of Somerville, aid 119 00 

City of Lowell 58 50 

Aid to State paupers 99 16 446 14 

$1,043 83 
Expenses of poor at Almshouse ... 71 7 35 

Total $1,761 18 

Inmates, 8 ; males, 4 ; females, 4 ; tramps, 485. 
MARTIN ROBBINS, 
EBEN T. ADAMS, 
NEWELL E. PARKER. 
ARTHUR H. SHELDON, 
GEO. F. SNOW, Overseers. 



23 

APPRAISAL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY AT TOWN 
FARM, MARCH 1st, 1895. 

7 cows. $200 00 

1 farm horse 135 00 

1 Democrat wagon, $35.00; 1 box wagon, $30.00 65 00 

1 farm wagon, $48.00 ; 1 one-horse cart, $25.00 73 00 

1 pair double harnesses, $20.00 ; 1 light harness, $10.00 30 00 

1 farm harness, $12.00 ; 1 cart harness, $4.00 16 00 

3 plows, $18.00 ; 2 harrows, $8.00 ; 1 horse hoe, $5.00.. 31 00 
1 one-horse sled, $28.00; 1 pung, $30 00 ; robes and 

blankets, $25.00 83 00 

Stable tools, $3.00 ; 3 ladders, $4.00 ; 15 chains, $2.50. 9 50 

8 shovels. $3.00; 1 mowing machine, $30.00; 6 hoes, 

$2.00 35 00 

7 forks, $3.00; 1 grindstone, $3.50; 6 rakes, $1.50; 1 

jack screw, 83.00 1100 

1 hay cutter, $5.00 ; sweet corn, $6.00 ; 36 barrels, $5.40 16 40 

8 tons E. hay, $160.00 ; grain chest, $6 00 ; grain, $12.00 178 00 
1 horse rake, $10.00 ; 5 shoats, $40.00 ; 2000 feet pine 

lumber, $24.00 74 00 

15 cords manure, $75.00 ; 66 fowls, $33.00 ; lot small 

tools, $34.00 142 00 

Provisions and supplies 304 10 

Household furniture and bedding 336 23 



$1,829 23 



J. P. EMERSON, 
D. P. BYAM, 
J. S. WOTTON, 

Appraisers. 



HIGHWAYS 

Geo. M. Wright, blacksmithing 

C. F. M. Fish, blacksmithing 

Harr}' L. Parkhurst, express 

Harry L. Parkhurst, brick and cement. . . 

Geo."Coburn, 2000 lbs. hay 

Geo. P. Mansfield, 16,240" lbs. hay 

Horace Holt, 4670 lbs. hay 

P. F. Litchfield, 2105 lbs. hay 

Dutton Bros., grain 

D. W. Bickford, grain 

R. W. Dix, labor on culvert 

C. Fin nick, breaking roads, 1893 

Amount carried forward 



; 72 20 






8 60 






50 






22 26 


$103 


56 


10 00 






155 09 






46 70 






10 53 


222 


32 


291 64 






31 74 


323 


38 


61 42 


61 


42 


7 87 







$710 68 



24 

Amount brought forward $710 68 

John McKennedy, breaking roads, 1893 $ 5 00 

Matthew Hayes," breaking roads, 1893 5 25 18 12 

Chelmsford Foundry Co., 100 loads cinders. 10 00 10 00 

D. A. Reardon, breaking roads 5 00 

J. H. Hazen, breaking roads 8 30 

J. J. Dunn, breaking roads 4 00 

Edward Doherty, breaking roads 4 50 

Fred L. Fletcher, breaking roads 20 25 

Warren Berry, et al., breaking roads 13 15 

Benj. O. Robbins, et al., breaking roads. ... 34 80 

Wm. Redmond, et al., breaking roads 38 00 

G. P. Mansfield, et al., breaking roads 9 75 

Geo. A. Byam, breaking roads 5 20 

Hazen Brothers, breaking roads 1 G 85 

H. R. Hodson, breaking roads 9 90 

E. E. Button, breaking roads 5 92 175 62 

James P. Emerson, breaking sidewalks 20 00 

E. T. Adams, 6010 lbs. bay 54 00 

B. M. Hildreth estate, 1310 lbs. hay 6 6o 60 65 

Geo. Suttle, 200 loads gravel ". 1 00 

Caleb L. Smith, 100 loads gravel 7 00 

D. M. George, 80 loads gravel 4 00 

F. W. Blodgett, 165 loads gravel 13 20 34 20 

I. H. Knight, cart body and painting 15 2-") 

repairing 6 00 

labor and supplies 9 10 

repairs . 5 25 35 60 

Chas. Dane, cutting brush ... 5 25 

Sarah L. Putnam, chestnut posts 6 25 1 1 50 

Edward Seymour, labor painting bridge 4 40 

H. E. Fletcher, corner and edge stones 152 28 

Staples Bros., drain pipe, cement, etc 161 29 317 97 

John Marine!, labor 3 20 

Charles A. Vinal, labor 1 50 

John Warley, labor 18 00 

George W. Chamberlain, labor 6 30 

William Scoble, labor 5 00 

Peter G. Hall, labor 10 00 

S. O. Sanderson, labor 8 50 

William Brown, labor 7 20 

George F. Snow, labor 10 00 

Fred L. Fletcher, labor 5 70 

M. G. Leonard, labor 5 00 

Charles Andrews, labor 1 45 

Arthur H. Sheldon, labor 5 25 

Amount carried forward SI ,394 34 



25 
Amount brought forward $1,394 34 

A. G. Parkhurst, labor $ 4 75 

G. H. Mason, labor and supplies 11 10 103 05 

J. S. Wotton, covering stone 50 00 

Katherine Savage, covering stone 3 20 

A. F. Crosby, edge stone 1 2 00 

A. F. Crosby, eight stone posts 8 00 

John Marinel, edge stone 24 00 47 20 

George E. Allen, scraper edge and bolts. .. 8 50 

Osgood & Snell, surveying 23 00 

Smith & Brooks, surveving 11 00 42 50 

A. L. Brooks, lumber 58 36 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 45 1C 

T. M. Bolton, brushes, oil, supplies for 

harnesses 39 55 

Staples Bros., drain pipe 21 54 

George O. By am, stone posts 3 00 

Bartiett & Dow, supplies 1 50 

J. S. Shed, plow points 1 80 112 49 

E. T. Adams, board of road men 696 00 696 00 

Highway pay roll for March 171 75 

April 322 39 

May 500 05 

June 325 25 

July 330 86 

August 185 00 

September 185 19 

October 413 29 

November 340 46 

December 223 71 

January 155 00 

February 117 86 3,270 81 



$5,774 75 



APPRAISAL OF HIGHWAY TEAMS AND TOOLS AT 
TOWN FARM MARCH 1, 1895. 

4 horses. . , $600 00 

2 pair double harnesses 80 00 

2 two-horse sleds 75 00 

1 Champion scraper 115 00 

2 two-horse carts 240 00 

1 jigger 30 00 



Amount carried forward $1,140 00 



26 
Amount brought forward $1 ,140 00 

1 two-horse wagon 35 00 

1 Chicago scraper 12 00 

1 scoop scraper 3 75 

2 large plows 14 00 

4 blankets 6 00 

1 spread chain, $1.00; 7 shovels, $4.00 ; 9 

picks, $7.00 ; 4 iron bars, $7.00 19 00 

4 chains, $7.00 ; 5 hammers, $6.00 ; 8 drills, 

$6.00; 2 stone picks, .50 19 50 

Whiffletrees, $1.50; axes, .50; tool chest, 

$5.00 ; 3 wrenches, $'2.00 9 00 

1 jack, $1.25; 1 cart body, $3.00 ; 1 drag, 

$2.00; 2 bush scythes, $1.50 7 75 

5 neck-yokes, $8.00 ; 1 pole, $1.50 ; rope .25 ; 

posts and plank, $18.00 27 75 

2 cesspool covers, $6.00 ; 1 grain chest, $5.00 ; 

4 feed bags, $2. 00 13 00 

New breechings, $6.00; 2 rakes, .75; hav, 
$2.50; stable tools, $2.00; 3 collars, 
$8.00 19 25 

1 fork, .25; 2 lanterns, .75 ; axle grease, 

$1.00; halters and rope, $2.50..". 4 50 

Shovel and broom, .50 ; bush hook and 1 saw, 
$2.00; 5 lbs. dualin, $3.00; spikes, 

$1.75 7 25 

$1,337 75* 

J. P. EMERSON, 
D. P. BYAM, 
J. S. WOTTON, 

Appraisers. 



REPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Dutton Bros., lumber for Almshouse $ 17 36 

Geo. W. Chamberlain, labor on farm build- 
ings 38 73 

E. R. Marshall, lumber for Almshouse 95 

A. P. Bateman, two windows 1 80 

F. G. Pratt, labor on Almshouse 5 98 

A. L. Brooks & Co., shingles, Almshouse.. . 44 79 

Elmer E. Hildreth, labor on barn 4 60 

Geo. M. Wright, grates and labor on tramp- 
house 3 37 



Amount carried forward » $1 1 7 58 



27 

Amount brought forward $117 58 

Harry L. Parkhurst, 176 brick for Almshouse $ 1 54 
Chelmsford Foundry Co., fire escape for 

Almshouse 134 00 $253 12 

F. G. Pratt, painting stage, Centre hall.... 6 93 
Geo. W. Chamberlain, labor, shingling 

Centre hall 46 63 

A. L. Brooks & Co., shingles, Centre hall.. . 48 80 

E. R. Marshall, lumber. Centre hall 1 70 

Dutton Bros., lumber for staging 88 

S. O. Sanderson, labor, shingling ,. 15 75 

W. McLarney & Co., urinal and pipe 3 25 

Joseph Teabo, cleaning up shingles 1 50 

F. G. Pratt, setting glass', etc 3 40 

W. H. Mack, two ash-pit doors 2 00 130 84 

G. W. Chamberlain, labor, school-honse No. 6 3 93 
A. L. Brooks & Co., shingles, school-house 

No. 6 23 46 

F. G. Pratt, painting fence and shed, school- 
house No. 6 7 62 35 01 

Geo. E. Spaulding, shingles and labor, 

scbool-house No. 8 101 39 

Geo. H. Smith, painting school-house, shed, 

fence, school-house No. 8 55 00 

C. B. Coburn & Co., paint, school-house 

No. 8 38 40 

Amasa Pratt & Co., sash and glass, school- 
house No. 8 , 1 05 

Bartlett & Dow, netting, school-house No. 8 46 

Geo. E. Spaulding, material and labor on 

flag staff, school-house No. 8 22 58 

Arthur H. Sheldon, labor and expense, 

school-house No. 8. . . - 4 75 223 63 

Davis & Sargent, shingles and boards, 

school-house No. 2 51 40 

E. P. Barclay, labor and supplies, school- 
house No. 2 70 74 122 14 

A. G. Parkhurst, paint and labor, school- 
house No. 9 43 60 

Charles Andrews, labor, school-house No. 9. 1 10 

Newell E. Parker, repairs, school-house No. 3 2 00 

Wm. Martin, labor, school-house No. 7.... 1 00 

S. Hagerman, paid for labor and supplies, 

school-house No. 1 36 37 

Peter J. Brennan, labor and stock, North 

Chelmsford hall 4 30 

$853 11 



44 


70 


2 


00 


1 


00 


36 


37 


4 


30 



28 

CARE AND IMPROVEMENT OF CEMETERIES. 

Serell Parent, 10 days' labor, Centre cemetery $18 00 

William Grimwood, clipping hedge 7 50 

L. K. Howard, labor, Centre 6 00 

S. W. Parkhurst, powder and fuse, Centre .. 1 15 $32 65 

Arthur H. Sheldon, paid for labor in North 

Chelmsford cemetery im . 13 75 

Geo. E. Spalding, building fence, North 

Chelmsford 18 00 

Geo. H. Smith, painting fence, North 

Chelmsford 19 12 

C. B. Coburn, paint for fence, North Chelms- 
ford 21 00 71 87 

Newell E. Parker, labor, South Chelmsford 

cemetery 3 00 

B. O. Robbins, labor, South Chelmsford 

cemetery 1 50 

Daniel P. Byam, labor, South Chelmsford 

cemetery 12 00 16 50 

Geo. F. Snow, labor and expense, West 

Chelmsford cemetery 4 00 

A. G. Parkhurst, labor and expense, West 

Chelmsford cemetery 6 00 10 00 

$131 02 



CARE OF CEMETERY FROM THE ADAMS EMERSON 

FUND. 

L. K. Howard, labor, with man $25 50 

J. H. Wilson, 5 days' labor with team 22 50 

Eliza A. Fletcher, 80 loads gravel. 8 00 

$56 00 



VILLAGE CLOCK. 
C. E. A. Bartlett, Treasurer, care of clock.. $30 00 



TRANSCRIBING ANCIENT RECORDS. 

Henry S. Perham, copying records $35 00 



29 



REIMBURSING CAVALRY. 



Elisha H. Shaw, Capt., reimbursement for 

expense of hall for annual ball, 1894.. $17 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

H. A. Cornell, services and expenses as 

Librarian 

Harold Davis, 25 hours' labor 

Nettie M. Stevens, 63 hours' labor 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books and cards... . 

Estes & Lauriat, books 

Buttei field Printing Co., supplies and cards, 
A. Heady Park, carrying books 



$ 56 


30 


2 


50 


12 


60 


161 


68 


3 


27 


9 


00 


13 


00 



$258 35 



NORTH VILLAGE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 
Clara A. H. Adams, Treasurer $200 00 



BILL FOR SCHOOL-HOUSE No. 8. 
Geo. E. Spalding, labor, building belfry. . .. $149 00 



LAND DAMAGES. 

O. M. Green, for lowering grade of street in 

front of premises - $75 00 

Peter O'Connor, removing fence 5 00 



$80 00 



MEMORIAL DAY. 

James P. Emerson, expenses of celebration 

Memorial day $50 00 



30 

COLLECTION AND ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

William L. Gordon, abatement for 1892 $ 4 80 

1893 125 39 

1894.... 85 23 $215 42 

Collecting taxes for years 

1892, 1893, 1894 348 44 

$563 86 



ENFORCEMENT OF LIQUOR LAW. 

Simon B. Harris, services in case of John L. 

La Mountain $59 86 

A. H. Sheldon, time and expense en- 
forcing liquor law 4 00 

$63 86 
STATE AID. 

Paid under Chapter 301, Statutes 1889 $852 00 

279, 1889 267 00 

$1,119 00 



TOWN OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES. 

E. W. Sweetser, services and expenses as 

Treasurer $150 00 

Geo. A. Park hurst, services and expenses as 

Town Clerk 67 61 

Lewis M. Dutton, services as Registrar.... 15 00 

Geo. A. Park hurst, services as Registrar... 20 50 

Stewart MacKay, services as Registrar, 1893 $ 9 25 

services as Registrar, 1894 1 1 00 20 25 

John F. McManomin, services as Registrar, 

1893 9 25 

John F. McManomin, services as Registrar, 

1894 1 1 00 20 25 

Warren Berry, services qs Warden, Precinct 

No. 1 3 00 

J. H. Redman, services as Warden, Precinct 

No. 1 3 00 

A. W. Holt, services as Inspector, Precinct 

No. 1 3 00 

Arthur M. Warren, services as Inspector, 



Amount carried forward $293 61 



31 
Amount brought forward $293 61 

Precinct No. 1 $3 00 

Walter Perham, services as Deputy Warden, 

Precinct No. 1 1 50 

D. P. Byam, services as Deputy Inspector, 

Precinct No. 1 ! 1 50 

Robert S. Ross, services as Deputy Inspector, 

Precinct No. 1 3 00 

Joseph E. Warren, services as Clerk, Precinct 

No. 1 6 00 

Arthur E. Reed, services as Teller, Precinct 

No. 1 1 50 25 50 

F. K. Ripley, services as Clerk, Precinct 

No. 2 6 00 

C. H. Dutton, services as Warden, Precinct 

No. 2 3 00 

Wm. J. Quigley, services as Deputy Warden, 

Precinct No. 2 1 50 

Charles H. Holt, services as Deputy Clerk, 

Precinct No. 2 * 3 00 

George Hyde, services as Inspector, Precinct 

No. 2 3 00 

Hubert Bearce, services as Inspector, Pre- 
cinct No. 2 3 00 

J. C. Hobbs, services as Deputy Inspector, 

Precinct No. 2 1 50 

J. B. McQuaid, services as Deputy Inspector, 

Precinct No. 2 150 

Charles A. Holt, services as Teller, Precinct 

No. 2 1 50 24 00 

E. W. S. Dutton, services as Warden, Pre- 

cinct No. 3 3 00 

A. G. Parkhurst, services as Inspector, Pre- 
cinct No. 3 3 00 

Joseph G.Quessey, services as Inspector, Pre- 
cinct No. 3 3 00 

M. H. Winship, services as Clerk, Precinct 

No. 3 6 00 

Joseph A. Parkhurst, services as Deputy 

Clerk, Precinct No. 3 3 00 18 00 

C. A. Holt, services as forest fire ward, 1893 5 00 

services as forest fireward. 1894. 6 60 

J. P. Emerson, services as Constable 

D. A. Polley, services as Constable 

Geo. F. Dyar, services as Constable 

J. H. McFarlin, services as Constable 

Amount carried forward $531 81 



11 


60 


60 


40 


34 


00 


53 


45 


11 


25 



32 
Amount brought forward $531 81 

John H. Nichols, services as Special Police 

Officer 

F. E. Nason, services as Constable 

C. S. Carter, services as Constable 

Wm. J. Quigley, services as Constable 

Orrin Pierce, services as Truant Officer 

D. A. Pol ley, services as Truant Officer. ... 
Charles Laflamme, services in case of John 

Whidden 

Lowell Police Department, care of prisoners, 
J. P. Emerson, services as Appraiser 

D. P. By am, services as Appraiser 

J. S. Wotton, services as Appraiser. 

E. C. Perham, services and expense as 

Cattle Inspector 

George F. Snow, services and expense as 

Assessor 

George F. Snow, copying Tax Collector's 

book 

Newell E. Parker, services and expense as 

•Assessor 

Arthur H. Sheldon, services and expense as 

Assessor 

Martin Robbins, services and expense as 

Assessor 

E. T. Adams, services as Selectman and 

Assessor 

George F. Snow, services and expense as 

Selectman 

Martin Robbins, services and expense as 

Selectman 

Newell E. Parker, services and expense as 

Selectman 

Arthur H. Sheldon, services and expense as 

Selectman 

Newell E. Parker, services as Board of 

Health Officer 

Arthur H. Sheldon, services as Board of 

Health Officer 

George F. Snow, time and expense attend- 
ing hearings 

Ziba Ga}\ services as Auditor 

E. F. Richardson, services as Auditor 

P. P. Perham, services as Auditor 





3 00 

7 00 

8 00 
6 50 
1 00 

11 66 


$ 3 00 
3 00 
3 00 


2 50 
1 00 

9 00 




441 43 


95 00 




15 00 


110 00 




50 25 




43 50 




25 00 




125 00 




60 00 




61 60 




52 25 




81 37 




15 00 




3 00 


3 00 
3 00 
3 00 


10 00 
9 00 




$1,668 87 







33 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Lowell Courier Publishing Co., printing 800 

Town and School reports S 86 10 

Lowell Courier Publishing Co., printing bill- 
heads, notices, etc 7 00 $ 93 10 

Boston Daily Globe, advertising 1 63 1 63 

John H. Nichols, services as janitor 11 

months Centre Hall 114 56 
care and expense Cen- 
tre Hall, February 
and March, 1894.. 

supplies for hall 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies for hall 

Harry L. Parkhurst, coal, 12,600 lbs., Cen- 
tre Hall 

E. L. Russell, wood for Centre Hall 

E. T. Adams, Supt., wood for Centre Hall. . 

A. B. Chapin, 1 block for Centre Hall. ... 
Wm. J. Quigley, care and expense of hall 

North Village 

J. Merrill & Son, cash book 

Harry L. Parkhurst, expressage 

Geo. A. Parkhurst, record books 

Wm. M. Sargent, letter heads and envelopes 

Bacheller & Dumas, tax book 

"Wm.. H. Hills, postals and stamps 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, ink 

Henry Howard, Fire Ward, North Village. . 
Morton B. Wright, Fire Ward, North Village 
Frank Pearson, Fire Ward, North Village. . 
Alfred DeCartaret, Fire Ward, North Village 
Charles Brett, Fire Ward, North Village.. . . 
M. A. Queen and 20 men, labor ut fire, 

North Village 

Geo. E. Spalding, stock and labor, rifle 

range, North Village 

C. F. Scribner, labor and supplies, rifle range 

Amasa Pratt, lumber for rifle range 

E. Shaw & Son, supplies for rifle range 

O. Olsen, labor on target 

B. F. Stetson, labor on target 

Bartlett & Dow, hooks and pulley for target, 

Centre 

Geo. M. Wright, fire poles and hooks, Centre 

J. J. Chun, police badge 

Harry Raynes, police badge 

Amount carried forward $589 15 



25 80 




20 77 


161 13 


21 79 




36 30 




9 25 




4 54 




25 


72 13 


75 24 


75 24 




2 50 




1 40 




9 25 




3 25 




3 25 




1 75 




2 00 


3 00 




3 60 




2 00 




2 00 




2 00 




22 00 


34 60 


18 49 




42 23 




20 06 




3 99 




11 55 




13 13 


115 45 




1 13 




8 34 


1 50 




1 50 


3 00 



34 

Amount brought forward $589 15 

French & Puffer, rep. lamp 

A. O. Richardson, revolver and cartridges. . 

E. A. & A. T. Smith, concreting walk, Cen- 
tre Hall 

Seth P. Sampson, labor on hose house, North 

Joseph Quessey, labor on ladder house, North 

Jesse Viles, services as veterinary 

Dr. E. H. Chamberlain, vaccinating 

Geo. F. Stiles, services and expenses in 
Mooney case 

Janbard Bros., handcuffs and jack 

Lowell Police Department lodging, prisoners. 

Dr. G-. A. Harlow, reporting births 

Arthur H. Sheldon, reporting deaths 

A. G-. Parkhurst, reporting deaths 

L. K. Howard, reporting deaths 

Arthur H. Sheldon, perambulating Town lines 

Town of Chelmsford, taxes 





2 00 




5 50 




21 60 




2 00 




28 




4 00 




2 50 




6 10 




4 25 




50 


2 00 


2 00 


3 25 




50 




2 50 


6 25 




2 50 




60 30 




$708 93 







35 



AGGREGATE OF APPROPRIATIONS, RECEIPTS AND 
EXPENDITURES. 



ACCOUNTS. 



APPROPRI 
ATIONS. 



Schools, Appropriations 

School fund 

Dog tax 

Tuition, non-resident pupils 

Teaching 

Care of houses 

Fuel 

A ppara tus 

School incidentals 

Free text books, appropriation 

Receipts 

Support of poor, Appropriation 

Receipts 

Highway, appropriation 

Receipts 

State aid, receipts 

Repairs of public buildings, appropriation 

Relief of indigent soldiers and sailors, appro- 
priation 

Relief of indigent soldiers and sailors, receipts 
Town officers and committees, appropriation.. 

Collection and abatement of taxes • 

Miscellaneous expenses, appropriation 

Receipts 

Enforcement of liquor law, appropriation... . 

Care and improvement of cemeteries 

Memorial day 

Village clock. 

Bell for school-house No. 8 

1'ublic library, appropriation 

Receipts' 

North Chelmsford Library association 

Heating apparatus, school No. 8 

Transcribing ancient records 

Transcribing soldiers' records 

Reimbursing Troop F, Cavalry 

Land damages, North Village 

Care of cemetery at Centre from the Adams 
Emerson fund 



$G,000 00 

293 45 

481 IS 

15 50 



125 00 

350 00 

COO 00 

53 75 

2,0 00 

2,200 08 

5,000 00 

1,536 75 

802 00 

COO 00 

100 00 

04 00 

1,100 00 

500 00 

300 00 

751 51 

100 00 

200 00 

50 00 

30 00 

150 00 

250 00 

14 08" 

200 00 

500 00 

165 00 

47 00 

17 00 



$24,656 87 



EXPKNDI- 
TURKS. 



$5,635 30 

352 85 

3C0 10 

80 01 

383 09 



716 87 
' 3, 961 86 


5,774 75 
852 00 
85{ 11 


267 00 

1,668 87 

56} 86 



708 93 
63 86 

131 (2 
50 (0 
30 00 

149 00 

200 00 

"35*66 

" 17*66 
80 00 

56 00 



$23,257 83 
1,399 04 



$24,656 87 $24,656 87 



$ 441 85 
35 99 



238 82 



re» 00 
10 00 



342 58 
36 14 
68 98 



1 00 



5 73 



500 00 
130 00 
47 00 



$2,620 09 



$2,620 09 $2620 09 



DEFI- 
CIT. 



$ 33 09 



63 12 



253 11 



103 00 
568 87 
63 86 



80 00 
56 00 



$1221 05 
1399 C4 



Appropriations $18,384 00 

Receipts 6,272 87 

Total $24,656 87 



Amount of orders $23,123 83 

Outstanding order 134 00 

Surplus 1,399 04 

Total $24,656 87 



EBEN T. ADAMS, 
GEORGE F. SNOW, 
MARTIN ROBBINS, 
NEWELL E. PARKER, 
ARTHUR H. SHELDON, 

Selectmen. 



Auditors' Report. 



We have examined the accounts of the Treasurer for the year 
ending Feb. 28, 1895, and find his receipts and payments properly 
entered and vouched for, and a balance of one hundred and ten and 
T 6 a °cF dollars ($110.60) in his hands. 

We have also examined the vouchers in the hands of the Select- 
men, and find in their hands receipts amounting to twenty-three 
thousand two hundred and fifty-seven and T 8 3 () dollars ($23,257.83), 
vouching for orders for the same amount drawn by them on the 
Treasurer, one of which, for one hundred and thirty-four dollars 
($134.00), is outstanding. 

We find assets : 

Cash in Treasury $ 110 60 

Tax of 1893 uncollected $947 14 

Interest accrued on same 93 91 

Tax of 1894 uncollected 4,112 77 

Interest accrued on same 119 98 5,273 80 

School books and supplies on hand 237 75' 

Due from the State : 

State a ; d to January, 1895 $703 00 

State aid for January and February, 1895. . 149 00 

Relief to January, 1895 127 50 

Relief for January and February, 1895 6 00 

Armory rent I 300 00 

Balance of Corporation tax 340 00 

Balance of National Bank tax 100 00 $1 ,725 50 

$7,347 G5 
Liabilities : 

Kimball fund and interest $1 24 52 

Silver fund and interest • lo2 34 

Emerson fund and interest 219 47 

Marshall fund and interest 100 00 

Shed fund and interest 104 58 

Interest on Edwards fund *.... 1 77 

Unpaid bills, estimated 665 00 

Tax abatements, estimated 22 '• 00 

Outstanding orders 134 00 $1,726 68 

Balance assets $5,620 97 

ZIBA GAY, 
E. F. RICHARDSON, 
PERLEY P. PERHAM, 
Chelmsford, March 4, 1895. Auditors. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



Middlesex, ss. 
To either of the Constables of the Town of Chelmsford, in said 
County, GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby 
required to notify the legal voter* of said Chelmsford to meet at the 
Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre, on Monday, the eighteenth day of 
March current, being the third Monday in said month, at nine 
o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act on the following 
articles, viz. : 

To choose a Moderator. 

To hear reports of Town Officers and Committees, and act 

thereon. 
To determine the manner of collecting taxes. 
To determine the manner of repairing the highways, town- 
ways, and bridges. 
To choose all necessary Town Officers. 
To act in relation to the list of jurors prepared by the 

Selectmen. 
To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be 

required to defray Town charges for the ensuing year. 
To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer to borrow 
such sums of money as may be required to defray Town 
charges for the ensuing year. 
To see if the Town will vote to grant licenses for the 
sale of intoxicating liquors for the current year. 
Article 10. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to act as 
its agent in any suit or suits which may arise during the 
ensuing year, and also in such other matters which may 
arise, requiring, in their judgment, the action of such 
agent. 
To see if the Town will accept the gift of a deed of land, 
with Library building thereon, from Amos F. Adams, 
located at corner of Adams Street and South Street, 
Cheimsford Centre, under the following restrictions: 

First— That it shall always be used for a Free Public 
Library. 



Article 1. 
Article 2. 

Article 3. 
Article 4. 

Article 5. 
Article 6. 

Article 7. 

Article 8. 



Article 9. 



Article 11. 



38 



Second— That there shall be no other building of any 
kind placed upon the lot. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will accept the gift of one hundred 
dollars, in trust, from Francis Day, as executor under the 
will of Alfred Day, the income to be used in taking per- 
petual care of the Alfred Day lot in Chelmsford Centre 
Cemetery, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 13. At the request of Geo. C. Moore and others, to see if the 
Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of extending the water pipe, with hydrants, 
easterly along Main Street to Depot Street, in North 
Chelmsford, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 14. At the request of Rev. John J. Shaw, E. F. Richardson and 
73 others, to see if the Town will grant permission to 
Rev. John J. Shaw, his successors and assigns, to use for 
the purpose of private burial, a certain lot or parcel of 
land owned by him, and situated on westerly side of 
Richardson Road, so called, which leads from the North 
Chelmsford and Chelmsford highway, to Westford Road,, 
and containing five acres, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to dedicate the new Library 
building, make arrangements for the same, and appro- 
priate monej r therefor, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of the 
Public Statutes, Chapter 27, Sections 64-73, inclusive, re- 
lating to the election of Selectmen, Assessors, and 
Overseers of the Poor, for the period of three years. 

Article 17. At the request of Wilbur A. Cheney, Charles T. Haskell 
and twelve others, to see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of build- 
ing a school-house in or near that part of Chelmsford 
known as •* Golden Cove," also to purchase land upon 
which to locate said school-house, or act in relation 
thereto. 

Article 18. At the request of Otis Adams, Geo. H. Wilson and 26 
others, to see if the Town will vote to reimburse J. M. 
Fletcher the sum of five hundred dollars ($500). that 
amount being a part of the money expended by him in 
grading that part of Fletcher Street lying between the 
road leading from the centre of the Town to North 
Chelmsford, and the house of Otis Adams, and raise and 
appropriate money therefor, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 19. At the request of Win. H. Hills, S. W. Parkhurst and 
others, to see if the Town of Chelmsford. Mass., will take 
the necessary steps, by petition to the Legislature or 
otherwise, to secure for the use of the Town, in its several 



39 



villages, the several ponds of water known as the " Bap- 
tist," or sometimes called " Hart's " pond, near South 
Chelmsford Village, the u Leach/' or sometimes called 
"Newfleld" pond, near North Chelmsford Village. Also 
the height of ground known as "Robin's Hill," and such 
other high ground near North and West Chelmsford as 
may be desirable for reservoir purposes, all for the use of 
the Town of Chelmsford, Mass., as a system of water 
supply for domestic use, and fire protection. And to 
secure the rights of the Town to such meadow lands on 
River Meadow Brook as may be needed, or desirable for 
the sinking of wells to supply the eastern part of the 
Town, and to protect the same from pollution in accord- 
ance with the statutes made and provided. 
Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Selectmen to 
put lettered boards in the several villages, forbidding the 
use of bicycles and tricycles upon the sidewalks of the 
Town. 
Akticle 21. To see if the Town will make an appropriation to the North 
Chelmsford Library Association, on condition that the 
books of said Library shall be free to all inhabitants of the 
Town, or act In relation thereto. 
Article 22. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of decorating the graves of our 
soldiers in the several cemeteries, on the 30th day of May 
next, or act in relation thereto. 
Article 23. At the request of F. E. Bickford, Warren Berry, II. H. 
Emerson, and twenty others, to see if the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose 
of digging a well and prepare it for a public watering 
place, at the South Village, upon the ground as located by 
the Selectmen, or act in relation thereto. 
Article 24. At the request of Elisha H. Shaw, H. H. Emerson and 
many others, to see if the Town will assume the charge of 
lighting the streets in the several villages of the Town^ 
raise and appropriate a sum of money to do the same, or 
act in relation thereto. 
Article 25. At the request of W. B. Cotton, C. O. Stevens and 18 
others, to see if the Town will adopt the Australian ballot 
system in the election of all Town Officers that are 
required by law to be voted for by written or printed 
ballot. 
Article 26. To see if the Town will adopt Sect. 1, Chap. 465 of the 
Acts of 1S93, in regard to using the McTaminany ballot 
box in connection with the Australian ballot. Articles 
25 and 26, if adopted, to be in force at all succeeding 
elections. 



40 



Article 27. At the request of L. M. Dutton and others, to see if the 
Town will vote to take up the article in regard to licens- 
ing the sale of intoxicating liquors, at or before 10.30 
o'clock in the forenoon, and that the polls remain open for 
voting on said article until the close of the meeting, with 
the exception of adjournment for dinner. 

Article 2S. At the request of E. H. Shaw and others, to see if the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sura of money 
for the purpose of heating and ventilating the school- 
house ill North Chelmsford, as required by the State 
Inspector. 

Article 29. At the request of Geo. F. Snow, to see if the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of one thousand 
dollars, to straighten and widen the street and bridge 
near the railroad station at West Chelmsford, in compli- 
ance with an order of the County Commissioners of Mid- 
dlesex County, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 30. At the request of E. H. Shaw, M. A. Queen and others, to 
see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to repair the 
damage done to the premises of E. Shaw & Son, now oc- 
cupied by them, caused by raising the grade of the high- 
way in front thereof, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 31. To see if the Town will accept the gift of a deed of land 
from J. Adams Bartlett upon the following express con- 
ditions : That said premises shall forever be kept open as 
and for a Public Park, and that no building shall ever be 
erected or allowed to stand upon said premises. 

Article 32. At the request of Peter J. Brennan and others, to see if the 
Tjwn will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of digging a well, providing a pump and 
prepare it for a public watering place at the northerly end 
of the Common in North Chelmsford, or act in relation 
thereto. 



And you are directed to serve this Warrant, by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the post offices in the centre of the 
Town, South Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, West Chelmsford, 
and at the school-house at East Chelmsford, ten days at least 
before the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of holcU 
ing the meeting: aforesaid. 



41 

Given under our hands this eighth day of March in the year of 
our Lord eighteen hundred and ninet\*-five. 

EBEN T. ADAMS, 
NEWELL E. PARKER, 
MARTIN ROBBINS, 
ARTHUR H. SHELDON, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 

I have served the foregoing Warrant, by posting up true and 
attested copies of the same at the places above mentioned, more 
than ten days before the day of holding said meeting. 

JAMES P. EMERSON, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



List of Jurors 

As prepared by the Selectmen, March <S, 1895. 



Andrews, Charles 
Adams, Timothy 
Butterfield, John H. 
Butters, Geo. E. 
Brown, I. Woodward 
Coburn, Edwin F. 
Durant, Geo. E. 
Dupee, Edmund F. 
Davis, Albert H. 
Dunn, John W. 
Elliott, Jasper 
Eaton, John P. 
Fowle, William R. 
Farrow, John A. 
Green, Oliver M. 
Howard, Lewis K. 
Holt, George H. 
Hall, John 8. 



Howard, Henry E. 
Lee, William M. 
Merrill, Frank G. 
Nichols, John H. 
Perham, Albert P. 
Pinkham, Arthur C. 
Parkhurst, Alfred G. 
Parker, Newell E. 
Parkhurst. Edwin K. 
Pickard, Daniel J. 
Russell, E. Lincoln 
Reed, Albert 8. 
Richardson, A. Howard 
Robbins, Martin 
Sprague, Cordice R. 
Stetson, George G. 
Stevens, Ephraim A. 
Vinal, Charles A. 

EBEN T. ADAMS, 

Chairman of Selectmen. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



Town of Chelmsford, Mass., 



FOR THE 



Year Ending February 28, 189^. 



LOWELL, MASS. 

COURIER-CITIZEN COMPANY, PRINTERS. 

1895 



Report of School Committee. 



The School Committee of the Town of Chelmsford 
lor the year 1894-95, held its first meeting March 
24, 1894. Samnel C. Hagerman was chosen Chair- 
man, John H. Redman, Secretary. George F. Snow 
was re-elected Superintendent of Schools and Book 
Agent for the Board. 

As members of the Committee we have en- 
deavored to discharge our various duties in a faithful 
manner. We feel that we have been favored in 
many ways, but especially so in the choice of Super- 
intendent and the corps of teachers who have labored 
with him during the past year. The present satis- 
factory condition of our schools is a sufficient proof 
of their persistent and painstaking work. Such work 
is eminently creditable, when we note the several 
serious difficulties with which both teachers and pu- 
pils have had to contend. 

The first and perhaps the most serious of these 
has been the crowded condition of the schools at 
the North Village and the Centre. We are glad, 
however, to report that steps are being taken toward 
remedying this difficulty. The Town, at its meeting 
last March, upon the recommendation of our pred- 



ecessors, appointed a committee to investigate and 
report upon this matter. The Chairman of this com- 
mittee has recently informed us that the members 
are still giving the matter their careful consideration. 
In the meantime we have endeavored to afford tem- 
porary relief in the matter of ventilation, etc. 

A second difficulty has been the lack of co-op- 
eration on the part of parents. We will not call it 
lack of interest, for we do not believe it to be such ; 
but rather the lack of an expression of interest. If 
the people of Chelmsford expect ideal schools, it is 
not enough that they appropriate generously for their 
support. They must visit the schools. Therefore while 
we heartily thank those who have shown their inter- 
est by their visits during the past year, we would 
remind those who may be displeased with the school 
work, that they have their part to take in making 
that work a success. 

Finally, a serious difficulty has presented itself in 
the shape of sickness among the scholars. Especially 
has this been the case at the Centre, where, owing 
to several cases of scarlet fever, we found it neces- 
sary to close the schools during a week in February. 

In connection with this matter we feel that it 
will not be amiss to call attention to certain laws 
regarding contagious diseases, etc. : — 

Every person having under his control a child 
between the ages of eight and fourteen years, shall 
annually cause such child to attend some public day 
school in the city or town in which he resides, and 



such attendance shall continue for at least thirty 
weeks of the school year, if the schools are kept 
open that length of time, with an allowance of two 
weeks' time for absences not excused by the Super- 
intendent of Schools or the School Committee, and 
for every neglect of such duty the person offending 
shall, upon complaint of a School Committee, or any 
Truant Officer, forfeit to the use of the public 
schools of such city or town, a sum not exceeding 
twenty dollars ; but if such child has attended, for 
a like period of time, a private day school, approved 
by the School Committee of such city or town, or 
if such child has been otherwise instructed for a 
like period of time in the branches of learning re- 
quired by law to be taught in the public schools, 
or if his physical or mental condition is such as to 
render such attendance inexpedient or impracticable, 
such penalty shall not be incurred. 

The School Committee shall not allow a child 
who has not been duly vaccinated, to be admitted 
to or connected with the public schools. 

Chapter 198 of the Acts of 1885 provides that 
the School Committee shall not allow any pupil to 
attend the public schools while any member of the 
household to which such pupil belongs, is sick of 
small-pox, diphtheria, or scarlet fever, or during a 
period of two weeks after the death, recovery, or 
removal of such sick person ; and any pupil coming 
from such household shall be required to present to 
the teacher of the school the pupil desires to at- 



tend, a certificate from the attending physician or 
Board of Health, of the facts necessary to entitle 
him to admission, in accordance with the above 
regulation. 

No child under thirteen years of age shall be 
employed at any time in any factory, workshop, or 
mercantile establishment. No such child shall be em- 
ployed in any indoor work, performed for wages or 
other compensation, to whomsoever payable, during 
the hours when the public schools of the city or 
town in which he resides, are in session, or shall 
be employed in any manner during such hours, un- 
less during the year next preceding such employ- 
ment he has attended school for at least twenty 
weeks, as required by law. 

No child under fourteen years of age shall be 
employed in any manner before the hour of six 
o'clock in the morning or after the hour of seven 
o'clock in the evening. No such child shall be 
employed in any factory, workshop, or mercantile 
establishment, except during the vacation of the public 
schools in the city or town where he resides, unless 
the person or corporation employing him procures 
and keeps on file a certificate and employment ticket 
for such child as prescribed by Section 4 of this 
act, and no such child shall be employed in any 
indoor work, performed for wages or other compen- 
sation, to whomsoever payable, during the hours when 
the public schools of such city or town are in ses- 
sion, unless as aforesaid, or shall be employed in any 



manner during such hours unless during the year next 
preceding such employment he has attended school 
for at least twenty weeks, as required by law ; and 
such employment shall not continue in any case 
beyond the time when such certificate expires. The 
Chief of the District Police, with the approval of 
the Governor, shall have authority to designate any 
kind or kinds of employment in factories, workshops r 
or mercantile establishments as injurious to the health 
of children under fourteen years of age employed 
therein, and after one week's written notice from the 
said chief to the employer or his superintendent, 
overseer or other agent of such designation, no child 
shall be employed in any such kind or kinds of 
employment in any factory, workshop, or mercantile 
establishment. 

No child under sixteen years of age shall be 
employed in any factory, workshop, or mercantile 
establishment unless the person or corporation employ- 
ing him procures and keeps on file the certificate 
required in the case of such .child, and also keeps 
on file a full and complete list of such children 
employed therein. 

Every parent or guardian of a child under four- 
teen years of age who permits any employment of 
such a child contrary to the provisions of this act, 
and every owner, superintendent, or overseer of any 
factory, workshop, or mercantile establishment who 
employs or permits to be employed therein any child 
contrary to the provisions of this act, and any other 



person who employs any child contrary to the pro- 
visions of this act shall, for every such offence, for- 
feit not less than twenty nor more than fifty dollars 
for the use of the public schools of the city or town. 
Every parent, guardian, or person authorized to sign 
the certificate prescribed by Section 4 of this act, 
who certifies to any materially false statement therein, 
shall be punished by a fine not exceeding fifty dol- 
lars, or by imprisonment not exceeding thirty days, 
or by both such fine and imprisonment. 

A failure to produce to a Truant Officer or 
Inspector of Factories the certificate required by the 
provisions of this act shall be prima facie evidence 
of the illegal employment of the child whose certifi- 
cate is not produced. 

Every owner, superintendent, or overseer in any 
such establishment, who employs, or permits to be 
employed therein, a child under fourteen years of 
age who cannot read and write, while the public 
schools in the city or town where such child lives 
are in session, and every parent or guardian who 
permits such employment, shall, for every such 
offence, forfeit not less than twenty nor more than 
fifty dollars for the use of the public schools of such 
city or town. 

Whoever wilfully and maliciously or wantonly 
and without cause destroys, defaces, mars, or injures 
a school-house, church, or other building erected or 
used for purposes of education or religious instruc- 
tion, or for the general diffusion of knowledge, or 



an outbuilding, fence, well, or appurtenance of such 
school-house, church, or other building, or furniture, 
apparatus, or other property belonging to, or con- 
nected with such school-house, church, or other build- 
ings, shall be punished by fine not exceeding five 
hundred dollars, or by imprisonment in the jail not 
exceeding one year. 

SAMUEL HAGERMAN, 

J. H. REDMAN, 

G. A. BYAM, 

D. P. BYAM, 

ORRIN PIERCE, 

CHARLES ANDREWS, 

HUBERT BEARCE, 

J. A. PARKHURST, 

C. A. RANDLETT, 

School Committee. 



Superintendent's Report. 



To the Chairman and Gentlemen of the School Committee : 

My annual report as Superintendent of Schools is here- 
by submitted for your consideration. 

In submitting this report I perform one of my last 
official acts in connection with this office, the duties of which 
I assumed eight years ago. 

It has devolved upon me through your^aid and co-opera- 
tion to make such changes in the schools, both in manage- 
ment and instruction, as seemed likely to improve them. 

I trust that the administration has proven of sufficient 
merit as to recommend it to your approval, and the approval 
of the public whom you represent. 

Allow me to express the hope that the future policy of 
your Board may be as liberal and progressive as it has been 
during my connection with your honorable body, and that my 
successor may find in you that aid and appreciation that has 
made possible the accomplishment of my plans and wishes in 
regard to the schools. I desire to express my thanks to the 
teachers for the cheerful spirit which has characterized their 
work, and in which they have co-operated with me in carry- 
ing forward the suggestions which I have made to them from 
time to time. This spirit has been not an unimportant factor 
in making this the most pleasant year of my work with you. 

My thanks are due the citizens and parents for their 
expressions of confidence in the public schools and their out- 
spoken words in their behalf. I bespeak for them the con- 



11 

tinued and increased interest of all. What, tell me, has been 
bequeathed to us by our forefathers more excellent, in honor 
and in value, than our system of public schools? What bet- 
ter treasure than intellectual and moral worth can we either 
possess ourselves or bestow on the children of our affections? 
Our Town has, I know, held for many years an honorable 
standing, as compared with towns around her, as regards 
expenditures for maintaining these schools. Long may she 
be honorable thus; and instead of tiring in the good work, 
let her rise to even a more liberal and higher position. 



PARENTAL INFLUENCE. 

Never was parental influence more needed by the teacher 
than now. Children come home with complaints that the 
teacher has unjustly punished them or given them too long 
a lesson. 

Now just as soon as the parent sees there is difficulty 
between the teacher and his children, he ought at once to 
look into the matter; for it is very indiscreet to decide on the 
testimony of an angry child, that the teacher is wrong and 
thus encourage the child in insubordination. 

The teacher in all probability is right, and needs your 
support. Go kindly, then, and see the teacher, for, in nine 
cases in ten, if not ninety-nine in a hundred, the teacher is 
right. Examine into the matter and you will find that your 
child was wrong and needed correction. It is miserably 
mean to go about the neighborhood and say the teacher is 
*' partial," or "has no judgment," or "hates your child," 
or " my child is not the worst in school," or " that somebody 
deserved punishment more." 



12 

Why not squarely put the question, is my child wrong? 
If, upon inquiry of the teacher, you find the child was, then 
stand by the teacher and sustain her to the end. The good 
of the school and the good of the community require it. 
Should the teacher be in the wrong, go to her kindly and tell 
her so, and she will be happy to correct any mistake she may 
have made. 

Therefore, stand by the teacher and sustain her. 



DISCIPLINE. 

The general moral effort and influence of the schools 
have been good in kind and degree, notwithstanding the ever- 
present and demoralizing influence of indecent and vicious 
manifestations of character by some pupils. From year to 
year I have endeavored, directly and indirectly, to inculcate 
among the pupils habits as well as forms of respect toward 
one another, toward teachers, toward school requirements, and 
toward those with whom they may be brought in contact in 
the great outside world: habits of punctuality, diligence, 
neatness, trustworthiness, purity of action, in word and deed, 
care and proper use of property, fidelity to friends and 
country. 

Here is found the power of a teacher's personality in 
creating a high moral tone in and about the school, which 
shall conduce rather to character building than to mere men- 
tal training. 



THE SCHOOL WORK. 

The year has been one of quiet progress. The work 
is evolutionary, rather than revolutionary. On the part 
of the teachers there seems to be a general desire for the 



13 

best, a willingness to work, a loyalty to the schools. Our 
schools seem to be exceptionally free from friction, irritation, 
and avoidable vexations. It is well, too, for there never can 
exist a thoroughly good school where discontent and discord 
prevail, or where the spirit of concord dwells not. 

The child certainly takes on the character of his environ- 
ments and is fashioned into the likeness of those in closest 
contact with him. 

Therefore, we should seek most for the spirit of the 
school and base our conclusion upon this. 

I believe an ambitious spirit, a generous spirit, a hopeful 
and ennobling spirit — in a word, the true spirit, is living 
and growing in our schools. 

May this continue ! Aid and gratitude to the teachers 
who are fostering it. Strict attention was given at the clos- 
ing of each term to ascertain the rate of each scholar's 
advancement, and I am pleased to announce that a good 
degree of progress has been made by nearly all the pupils 
during the year. 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. 

Of our fifteen schools ten have retained the same 
teachers throughout the year and eight for a longer period. 

These veteran teachers have done superior work. Those 
who have come to us during the year have brought a degree 
of scholarship, an earnestness of purpose, an elevation of 
character, and, in most cases, an ability and energy in man- 
agement, that have won the respect of the school and com- 
munity and insured a gratifying degree of success. 



14 



MIXED SCHOOLS. 

The work prescribed for these schools and the manner of 
doing it, have been carried out through the year with much 
uniformity and with generally satisfactory results. The prev- 
alence of contagious disease injuriously affected the attend- 
ance upon some of these schools. Yet in addition to 
absences caused by sickness, dread of contagion, or some 
imperative necessity, how many result from an inconsiderate 
indulgence of childish notions or parental ease or profit- 
When the child, grown to man's estate, sees the worth of the 
precious time thus lost, he will not hold his parents guiltless. 
Absence for a day, or even a single half-day, is a serious 
injury to the pupil. Each day's work completed is a sure 
foundation for the next day's course of discipline and instruc- 
tion. But the lessons of the day being lost, some of the next 
are generally unprepared, for the old excuse is ever ready : 
" I was absent and don't know the lesson." 

How difficult it is for instructors to excite and sustain the 
interest of their pupils, how hard a task for a pupil, unless 
present at every recitation, to surmount each new obstacle 
and firmly grasp each new principle, no one but a practical 
teacher can fully appreciate. Those absent days produce 
habits of neglect, and failures occur often. 

The absentee loses his interest, if he ever had any, in his 
studies, hangs like a dead weight on the class, and finally 
drops into a lower division, or out of school entirely. The 
teachers deserve the highest praise for their unwearied pains 
to keep tardy and absent marks from their school registers. 
Those who have interested the parents in this matter of reg- 
ular attendance have accomplished the most, for, when a 
teacher manifests a personal interest in a pupil, the parent is 
pleased and the child will generally be punctual at school. 



15 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



As a whole the Primary Schools are in better condition 
than they were a year ago, and their work is a testimonial to 
what can be accomplished when the same faithful and con- 
scientious teachers are long continued in their work. If we 
wish to have pure water in a river, we must look to the purity 
of the springs at its source ; if the springs are pure, the 
whole river will be pure. So in a system of education we 
must look to the Primary Schools first. With these working 
• in the right direction, in the course of time the whole system 
must be benefited. The task of the Primary School teacher 
is, in my opinion, more difficult and gathers around itself 
more discouragements than that of any other teacher engaged 
in our common school system. Within eight, or at the most 
nine, years these little ones ought to be brought to the door 
of the High School, well qualified to run the race which will 
there open before them. 

How important that they be started correctly on this 
long and wearisome journey ! How essential that their 
impressions at the outset be cheerful, that their ideas be true 
and noble, and that their love of school be planted deeply 
within them ! 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

The work of the year has been progressive and satisfac- 
tory. In the Intermediate Schools the children by their 
keen and quick perceptions gain a fair knowledge of the 
chief elements of arithmetic, geography, history and nature 
study, and in the years that follow this knowledge is 
extended more readily and satisfactorily than by spending so 
much time exclusively upon the few subjects that formed the 



16 

staple of the school programme of ten years ago. To the 
children who are obliged to leave school while in the lower 
grades, the training in these studies is an advantage, which 
a postponement of them to the higher grades deprives 
them of. 

Again, and this is the chief advantage, if rightly taught, 
children will acquire a taste for these subjects, which will 
lead to formation of habits of reading and study when school 
days are over. Especial effort has been made in this grade 
to improve the writing. The results of the effort are now 
visible and I am able to report great improvement. 

The writing in the schools should be uniformly good ; 
and once we reach the standard we are striving for, it can be 
easily maintained. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The instruction in the Grammar Schools has steadily 
improved during the year, and the results have been, in 
most cases, satisfactory. I have endeavored to make prom- 
inent in all the schools, and especially in these, practical 
language work. In addition to the regular exercises in 
dictation, letter writing, and composition, I have urged upon 
the teachers the necessity of giving especial attention to such 
exercises as would lead to correct and fluent expression on 
the part of the pupils. The ability to express one's thoughts 
on paper gracefully is an accomplishment greatly to be 
desired : but the ability to express one's thoughts orally and 
readily is more than an accomplishment: it is a necessity. 

To be able to do this grammatically is well worth any 
effort that may be required. Practice, constant, persistent 
practice, alone will do it. Good work in arithmetic has been 



17 

accomplished in this grade. This is sometimes called a 
bread-and-butter science, and has ever appealed with great 
force to all classes. If a large proportion of what is offered 
in the written arithmetic should be treated as mental prob- 
lems, all manual operations being omitted, far more discipline 
and power would be the outcome. Mental arithmetic leads a 
pupil to read a problem intelligently, to see conditions 
readily, to think a correct conclusion, and express the same 
to others promptly and accurately — far more than can result 
from much of the figure work of to-day. 



HIGH SCHOOLS. 

The patient, quiet and progressive administration of the 
High Schools is making itself felt. The schools have 
continued to improve, both in the character of the work and 
in the spirit and conduct of the pupils. 

The subjects of study are essentially the same as for the 
last few years, but the ways of dealing with these subjects are 
coming more and more into harmony with the laws of physi- 
cal, mental and moral growth. 

The graduating exercises of the High Schools occurred 
at the close of the spring term, in the presence of audiences 
limited only by the capacity of the local Town Halls. The 
platforms were tastefully adorned with floral and other deco- 
rations. The well-delivered essays were of unusual excel- 
lence, presenting a pleasing variety of subject and thought in 
an easy and graceful manner. 

The following programmes were given : 



18 
PROGRAMME. 

{Centre High School, Chelmsford, Mass.) 



MARCH. Selected. 

ORCHESTRA. 

INVOCATION. 

REV. GRANVILLE PIERCE. 

OVERTURE. "Graduation." Latann 

ORCHESTRA. 

SALUTATORY ESSAY. " Success." 

MASTER RALPH W. EMERSON. 

FOLK-SONG. " There's One That I Love Dearly." 

QUARTETTE. 

ESSAY. " A Charcoal Sketch." 

MASTER HARRY A. DUTTON. 

RECITATION. " An Order for a Picture." 

MISS MABEL F. FENDERSON. 

SELECTION FROM "1492." 

ORCHESTRA. 

ESSAY. " Class History." 

MASTER EDWIN L. STEARNS. 

"IF THE WATERS COULD SPEAK AS THEY FLOW." Graham 

DR. F. R. RIX AND QUARTETTE. 

ESSAY. "Germs." 

MISS AGNES L. NICHOLS. 

CORNET SOLO. "Une Serenade." Chapelle 

MASTER G. THOMAS PARKHURST. 

ESSAY. " Last Decree of the Delphic Oracle." 

MISS EDNAH F. BYAM. 

CLASS ORATION. " The Duties of Citizenship." 

MASTER EDWARD J. ROBBINS. 

SOLO. " To a Spring Flower." Cirillo 

MR. T. F. MOLLOY. 

ESSAY. " Class Prophecy." 

MASTER WILLIE H. FULTON. 

SERENADE Hartel 

QUARTETTE. 



19 
ESSAY. " Education." 

MISS JESSIE M. HOLT. 

"THOSE EVENING BELLS." Eilenberg 

ORCHESTRA. 

VALEDICTORY ESSAY. "Friendship." 

MISS ALICE M. STEARNS. 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

SUPERINTENDENT GEO. F. SNOW. 

CLASS ODE. 
BENEDICTION. 

REV. H. A. CORNELL. 



GRADUATES. 

Ednah Florence Byairi. Jessie May Holt. 

Harry Ayer Duttoo. Agnes Lee Nichols. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson. Edward Jenkins Robbius. 

Mabel Florence Fenderson. Alice Margaret Stearns. 

Willie Howard Fulton. Edwin Lewis Stearns. 

CLASS OFFICERS. 
Edward J. Robbins, President. 

Ednah F. Byam, Secretary and Treasurer. 



PROGRAMME. 

{North Chelmsford High School.) 
OVERTURE. 

ORCHESTRA. 

INVOCATION. 

REV. S. I. BRIANT. 

SALUTATORY WITH ESSAY. " Early American Literature." 

LOTTIE L. SNOW. 

ORATION. " Architecture." 

FRED CHANDLER. 

ESSAY. " Flowers." 

NELLIE B. TRUBEY. 

WALTZ. Selected. 

ORCHESTRA. 

HISTORY AND ESSAY, " Lucy Larcora." 

HATTIE MAY HALL. 



20 



PROPHECY AND ESSAY. " Physical Education." 

A. E. DUNCAN. 

DUET. " Land of the Setting Sun." 

MR. AND MRS. HUBERT BEARCE. 

VALEDICTORY WITH ESSAY. "Self Control." 

LAURA I. LUMBERT. 

CONFERRING OF DIPLOMAS. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

SINGING OF CLASS ODE. 

MISS CLARA A. WRIGHT, ACCOMPANIST. 

SELECTION. 

ORCHESTRA. 



GRADUATES. 

Nellie Bertha Trubey. Lottie Louise Snow. 

Laura Isola Lumbert. Hattie May Hall. 

Augustus E. Duncan. Fred Chandler 



THE NATURAL SCIENCES. 

I have learned to believe that children should be put, in 
tjieir early years, to the study of nature. I did not think so 
once, but now I do. I have seen a school of intermediate 
giade, under a competent teacher, studying physics, botany, 
physiology, and other natural sciences with great enthusiasm 
and complete success. The work was done without a text- 
book. The instruction was given orally by conversation, 
charts, pictures, real objects, and experiments. The children 
were taught to analyze and draw flowers and plants, to 
observe and study animal life, and make experiments. The 
children had no time for mischief, and were very happy in 
their work. The school governed itself, and habits of careful 
and constant observation were formed. Of course, the higher 
ranges of these studies will be reserved for advanced grades 



21 

and schools. But if a love for this work and proper habits 
of observation and reflection are formed in the lower schools 
they will ensure success in the upper. 

I am confident that the proper way to enrich the studies 
of Grammar and High Schools is to lay the foundation for it 
in the lower grades. Let us throw out all along the line the 
rubbish and put in what is practical and disciplinary. 

These are the things which interest children and prevent 
waste. Uninterested schools are noisy schools, but interested 
schools govern themselves. By saving waste, we shall save 
our children. I recommend the introduction of nature 
studies in the lower grades. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I would remind you, gentlemen, and, 
through you, the citizens of the Town, that the personal, 
hearty co-operation and sympathy of all, with both teachers 
and pupils, are essential to the success of our school system. 
The most perfect of systems, and most learned of teachers, 
will not alone make satisfactory schools. A school can not be 
made to run like a piece of mechanism and perfectly accom- 
plish its work. It has a certain personality, whose attributes 
must be considered. Without enthusiasm on the part of 
teachers and pupils, school work becomes drudgery and 
heartless, servile toil. The machinery of the system may 
run smoothly, but the result will be boys and girls anxious to 
escape from the servitude of school rather than become 
educated men and women. What the schools most need now 
is an enthusiasm that will render the work of pupils and 
teachers less mechanical and formal, more hearty and earnest. 
For the inspiration of this enthusiasm, we are dependent 
almost entirely upon the encouragement and sympathy 



22 

received from parents and citizens, and this encouragement 
and sympathy teachers and pupils have, equally, a right to 
claim at their hands. 

I take this opportunity to express my gratitude for the 
hearty co-operation that has been extended to me by all the 
members of the teaching staff, and take pleasure in acknowl- 
edging their willingness and industry in the performance of 
the duties of their position. 

The harmony and good fellowship that has prevailed 
throughout has rendered my work easier and pleasanter. 

I wish, also, to thank the members of the Board for the 
assistance given me in the discharge of my duties as Super- 
intendent. My relations with school official, teacher, child, 
and parent, were never more congenial. 

I wish to leave this record of my gratitude for all favors. 
Wishing for the schools of Chelmsford the highest attain- 
ments and the richest success. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEO. F. SNOW, 
Superintendent of Public Schools. 

Chelmsford, Mass., Mar. 2, 1895. 



Roll of Honor. 



JScholars not absent or tardy; scholars not absent but tardy*.] 

CENTRE HIGH, NO. 1. 

Three Years — Alice M. Stearns, Jessie M. Holt*. 

One Year and One Term — Chas. P. Holt, Edward J. 
Robbins*. 

One Year — May B. Bartlett, Leslie R. Davis. 

Two Terms — Christina Ashworth, Theodore A. Cornell, Grace 
G. Garland, Arthur A. Harmon, G.Thomas Parkhurst, Ralph H. 
Stearns, Lizzie K. Stearns. 

One Term — Alexina Bremner, Harold H. Davis, Pearl F. 
Dvar, Hatlie M. Emerson, John B. Emerson, Willie H. Fulton, M. 
Etta Gill, A. Hawthorn Howard, Edwin L. Stearns, Lizzie K. 
Stevens, Florence E. Ward, Annie M. Wood. 

CENTRE GRAMMAR, No. 1. 

Three Years — E. Belle Adams. 

One Year — Arthur Adams, Ralph Adams, Mabel Nason*. 

Two Terms — George French, Arthur Hill, Fred Holt, Ella 
Hod*on, Ever Briggs, Maud Ludwig, Lawrence Marshall, Sadie 
Newhall, Frank Melvin. 

One Term — Anna Bliss, Stanley Cotton, Arthur Staples, 
Arnold Perham. 

CENTRE INTERMEDIATE, No. 1. 

One Year — Louise Adams. 

Two Terms — Willie Adams, Paul P. Davis, Emma G. Ghcl- 
den, Frank Hodson, Albert Ludwig, M. J. Pratt, Bennie Rowell*, 
Ralph Caverlv*. 

One Term— Fred W. Holt, Arthur J. Hill, Bertha E. Ober, 
Oscar Hodson, Ella Knowlton, Harry Harmon, Alfred Howard, 
Ethel Daw, Hattie Dryden, Herbert Chamberlin, Clarence Kelley*, 
Harlan E. Knowlton*, Charles Chamberlin*. 



24 

CENTRE PRIMARY, No. 1. 
One Year — Marion Adams. 
Two Terms — Edith Bliss. 

One Term — Willie Adams. Lina Chamberlin, Elsie Shat- 
tuck, Eugene Chamberlin. 

MIXED NORTH ROW, No. 2. 

Two Terms — Eliza Spaulding. 

MIXED SOUTH, No. 3. 

One Year— Sydney Dupee. 

One Term — Alta B. Byam, Elizabeth Byam, Albert Holtam. 

MIXED SOUTH ROW, No. 4. 

One Year — Walter Hosmer Redmau, H. Stewart Redman, 
Willie Robbins. 

Two Terms — Edward B. Redman, Leon Parker. 

One Term — Frank Melvin, Percy B. Redman. 

MIXED BYAM'S, No. 5. 
Two Terms — Carrie Newhall, Walter Crooker. 
One Term — Francis O. Dutton. 

MIXED EAST, No. 6. 

One Year — Marshall Dix. 

'Two Terms — Ralph Howland, James Leahy. 

One Term — J a}' Plummer, Arthur Severance, Heniy Dix, 
George Barris, Wilfred Leahy, Florence Leahy, Thomas O'Hara* 
Benjamin O'Hara, Pearl Dyar*, Harry Wilson*, Alice Dyar*. 

NORTH HIGH, No. 8. 

Two Terms — Reginald Sheldon, Frank Hall, Walter Marinal, 
George Lumbert*. 

One Term — Stephen Ward, Fred Snow, Arthur Marinah 
Florence Winship. 

NORTH GRAMMAR, No. 8. 

One Term — Stephen Wood, Frank Hall, Regis Sheldon, 
Thomas McTague, Ina Lumbert, Georgia McEnnis, Hebert 
Worden. 



25 

NORTH INTERMEDIATE, No. 8. 

Two Terms — Stewart MacKay, Walter Worden, Edwin 
Davis*. 

One Term — Willie Tobin, Ralph Clark, James McTague, 
Maud Wright, Georgia McEnnis, Ina Lumbert, May Belle Howard, 
Gladys Swain, Thomas Towle, Esther Bearce*, Thomas Larkin*. 

NORTH PRIMARY, No. 8. 

Two Terms — Fred MoEnaney, Clifford Queen, John Varney, 
Ma} T McCluske} 7 , Katherine Sheldon, Lester Worden, Chester 
Worden. 

One Term — Ethel B. Wotton, Esther A. Bearce, Martha 
McCluskey, Florence Queen, Gladjs Swain, James H. McCo}-, 
Anna MacKay, Joseph McTague. 

WEST GRAMMAR, No. 9. 
One Year — Herbert Jordan. 

One Term — Helen Knowles, Emma Holt, George Knowles, 
Charlie Martin, Ella M. Winship. 

WEST PRIMARY, No. 9. 

Two Terms — Millie A. Dunn, Harry Daw, Nellie Aberham- 
son, Harrison Mason. 

One Term — Augusta Auderson, Sarah A. Boynton, FaDnie 
Corrigan, Stella Daw, Henry Jordan, Walter Guyette, Patsy Flynn, 
Chris Newman, Willie Miller, Albeit Miller. 



26 



STATISTICAL TABLE OK SCHOOLS IN THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASS. 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEB. 28, 1895. 

SPRING TERM. 



SCHOOLS. 


o 
o 

o 

1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

(» 
8 
8 

8 

8 
9 



TEACHERS. 


X 

B 



S 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


>> 

Q 


U 

■B 

"5c 

o 

h 

C 

32 

46 
S7 
51 
14 
25 
26 
'.) 
43 
23 
3- 
41 
62 
23 
31 


o 

S 

V 

S 

« . 

O a) 

< 


T3 

a 
"S 

be ** 

£S 

o a 

> 

< 


II 


■ 
S 

o 

IQ 

> 

c 

25 
2 

19 

3 


d 

co 
B 
V 

o 
22 

2 
43 
36 
22 

8 
17 
17 

6 
28 

17 
40 
17 
21 

16 


B 

o 

a 

h 

ft, 

CD 

o 

$76 00 
42 00 
30 00 
36 00 
32 00 
34 00 
34 '0 
32 00 
36 00 
84 00 
36 00 
36 00 
36 00 
36 00 
36 00 


in 
9 

1 

"5 
o 
H 


High, Centre 

Grammar, Centre.. 
Ini'rm'di'te, Centre 
Primary, Centre... 
Mixed, Nortli Row 

Mixed, South 

Mixed, Soutli Row. 

Mixed, By urn's 

Mixed, East 

High, North 

Grammar, North... 
Interm'diate, North 

Primary, North 

Grammar, West 

Primary, West 


Susie M. Emerson.. 
Susie S. McFarlin.. 
Caroline L. Adams. 
Alice G. Wheeier.. 

Daisy Hartley 

Belle B. Hiidley.... 
Helen E. Osgood.. 
Grace E. Mansfield. 
Helen E. Gookin... 
Arthur W. Trubey. 
Winuifred Miller... 
Nellie M. Baker.... 

Laura G. Hoyt 

Klla A. Hutchinson 
Agnes Naylor 


31.54 
44.50 
34 5 
45 51 
12.3 
22.67 
24.7 
0. 
38.2 
20 48 
33.02 
37.00 
46.07 
21.2 
30.2 


30 72 
42.16 
32.09 

41.76 
11.1 
20.28 
22.7 
8.65 
3*71 
19 59 
32.70 
35.23 
44.83 
19.06 
28.07 


97.4 

9473 

05.63 

88.53 

90. 

02. 

0180 

05. 

00.8 

05 57 

07 42 

04.97 

05. 

03. 

03. 


$228 00 
126 00 
108 00 
10S 00 

06 00 
102 00 
102 00 

96 09 
10S 00 
252 00 
108 00 
108 00 
108 00 
108 00 
108 00 



FALL TERM. 



High, Centre 

Grammar, Centre.. 
Int'rm'di'te, Centre 
Int'rm'di'te, Centre 
Primary, Centre... 
Mixed, North Row 

Mixed, South 

Mixed, South Row. 
Mixed, By urn's ... 

Mixed, Fast 

High, North 

Grammar, North... 
Intermedi'te, North 

Primary, North 

Grammar, West... 
Primary, West 



1 Susie M. Emerson. 
lj Susie S. McFarlin. 
1 Caroline L. Adams 

1 Frances Clark 

1 Alice G. Wheeler.. 
2|Daisy Hadey 

3 Belle B. Hartley.... 

4 Helen M Osgood.. 

5 Grace E. Mansfield 

6 Helen E. Gookin... 
8 Arthur W. Trubey. 
8 Nellie M. Bilker... 
8 Fannie Voter 

8 Laura G. Hoyt 

9 Carrie K. Erskine.. 
9 Agnes Naylor. 



3 




38 


34.66 


33.93 


97.8 


22 


5 


$70 00 


3 




52 


46.25 


42.83 


02.59 




43 


42 00 


1 


5 43 


41. 


39.77 


07. 




41 


86 00 


1 


15 














36 00 


3 




42 


36.12 


32.79 


oi.oi 


.. 


12 


36 00 


3 




13 


10. 


0.5 


05. 


1 


s 


32 HO 


3 




30 


23. 


20 6 


02. 




21 


34 00 


3 




20 18.5 


17.4 


04. 




15 


34 00 


3 




15 12.67 


11.72 


02. 




11 


32 00 


3 




46 41.88 


30.3 


03.8 




24 


40 00 


3 




20 


25.78 


24.62 


05 30 


20 


3 


84 (0 


3 




38 


:^4.26 


32.55 


03.84 




31 


36 00 


3 




30 


31.78 


30 55 


95. IS 




38 


30 00 


3 




57 


45 58 


43.15 


95. 




13 


36 00 


3 




10 


18.75 


16.08 


00. 




17 


36 <0 


3 




:ii) 


36.43 


33.8 


92. 


•• 


21 


36 00 



$228 00 
126 00 
45 00 
63 00 
108 00 
96 00 
102 00 

102 00 
06 00 

120 00 
252 00 
108 00 
10S 00 
10S 00 
108 00 

103 00 



WINTER TERM. 



High, Centre 

Grammar. Centre.. 
Intermedi'e, Centre 
Primarv, Centre... 
Mixed, North Row. 

Mixed, South 

Mixed, South Row. 
Mixed, Soutli Row. 
Mixed, Byam's.... 

Mixed. East 

High, North 

Grammar, North... 
Grammar, North... 
Intermedi'te, North 
Primary, North.... 
Grammar, West... 
Primary, West 



Susie M. Emerson. 
Susie S. McFarlin.. 

Frances Clark 

Alice G. Wheeler.. 

Daisy Hadley 

Helen G. Fulton... 
Helen M. Osgood., 
lin'ce J. Washburn 
Grace E. Mansfield 
Helen E. Gookin... 
Arthur W. Trubey. 
Jennie McKenzie.. 
Nellie M. Baker.... 

Fannie Voter 

Laura G. Hoyt 

Citrrie E. Er.-kine.. 
Agnes Naylor 



|37|34. 



50 42.40 
4l|37.48 
o6 25 6 
13|l0. 
26' 10.8 
20' 14.4 

ii'ij.'" 

3036. 
37 30.09 



!3.63 



32 82 
41.83 
10 17.67 
38 33.0 



32.89 
311.28 
34.71 
22.83 
0.8 
18.8 
13.4 



11.04 
34.51 
21). 12 
21.10 



30.12 
38.06 
15.65 
30.86 



95.3 

01.04 

02.66 

00.7 

98. 

1)4. 

03. 



05.9 
94 18 

00.16 



01.66 
01. 



->i 



' $:o oo 


42 00 


36 00 


30 00 


36 00 


34 00 


34 00 


34 00 


32 00 


40 00 


H 00 


36 00 


36 00 


36 60 


36 00 


36 00 


36 00 



$228 00 
126 00 
108 00 
00 00 
96 00 

102 00 
78 20 
23 80 
96 00 

120 00 
252 00 
92 70 
12 00 
108 00 
108 00 
108 00 

103 00 



Total schools, 15. Total teachers, 15. 



Total wages, $5,60.5 30 



AfltfUAIi $EPO$T 



OF THE 



MIES 1 1 IE 11 Elf 



OF THE 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASS., 



FOR THE 



Year Ending February 28, 1895. 



Report. 



The Board of Trustees of the Free Public Library respectfully 
submits the following report concerning the second year's adminis- 
tration of the Library : 

After organizing by the selection of Mr. H. S. Perham as 
Chairman, and Mrs. H. M. Bartlett as Secretary, the first duty of 
the Board was to secure the service of a competent person as 
Librarian, in place of Miss Nettie M. Stevens, who had resigned. 
Rev. H. A. Cornell was induced to accept the position, and has 
served faithfully during the entire year, giving many hours' extra 
labor to the promotion of the Library's interests, and securing some 
valuable donations. With the aid of his son, Theodore, the service 
to patrons has been much expedited, greatty relieving the discomfort 
and inconvenience of the narrow quarters to which the Library has 
been confined. It has been impossible to provide any waiting-room 
for the patrons save the entry of the Town Hall, and as this could 
not be heated during the cold season, there was much exposure and 
discomfort, which seemed inevitable, but which has been patiently 
endured in hope of better things to come. These inconveniences, 
which were spoken of at length in our former report, have been felt 
even more during the past year than during the previous one, 
on account of the longer season during which the Library has been 
open, and on account of the larger number of persons using it. 
There is, however, we are happy to say, a prospect of early 
and permanent relief. 

The Library has been open for public use for eleven months of 
the past year, 96 periods of two hours each, viz. : on Weclnesda3 r s 
from 3 to 5 o'clock, and on Saturdays from 6 to 8 o'clock P. M. 
The smallest delivery of books at any one time of opening was 36 
on June 27, and the largest was 122 on Jan. 2. There is no basis 
for a comparison of the circulation of this year with previous ones, 
since the Library was open for but a part of the first year of its ex- 
istence. Yet such figures as can be given show r a gratifying increase 
of patronage. The number of volumes taken out during the last 



year of the old Social Library was reported as 1,910; the number 
during the first year as a Free Library, open for about five months T 
was 2,647 ; the number from March 22, 1894, to Feb. 20, 1895, 
eleven months, has been 7,342. The first two months of the present 
year, March to May, show a circulation of 1,374; the last two 
months, December to February, a circulation of 1,512. The aum- 
ber of persons using the Library this year was 408, against 269 last 
year. Such an increase amply demonstrates the wisdom of the 
Town's action in establishing the Library on the basis of a 
free public, rather than a subscription, library. May we not believe 
that the public benefit from the circulation of a high class of litera- 
ture, not simply in the waj- of amusement, but as well in the increase 
of intelligence and refinement, has increased in like proportion ? An 
encouraging index of the gratification of such hopes is to be found in 
the large use of the Library by pupils of the Grammar and High 
schools, to a considerable extent under the advice and direction of 
the teachers. 

The patronage has come most largely, as would naturally be 
expected, from the population of the Centre Village and its vicin- 
ity. The Trustees have not as yet felt justified in expending any 
considerable portion of the funds for the transportation of books to 
other parts of the Town. The service has been performed for the 
people of South Chelmsford, by Mr. A. Heady Park, one of the 
members of this Board, for a very small compensation, exchanging 
the books once in two weeks. The hearty thanks of the Trustees 
are due and are hereby given to Mrs. N. B. Lapham of South 
Chelmsford for her kindness in allowing her house to be used with- 
out compensation as the distributing and collecting agency for the 
books circulated in that community. There has also been a fair 
share of circulation in the East Chelmsford neighborhood, the 
patrons coming individually. The remainder of the Town has 
made almost no use of this Library, the people of the North and 
West Villages being much more conveniently served b}- the North 
Chelmsford Library Association, whose excellent collection of books 
has been made free to all inhabitants of the Town for the past year 
by an appropriation for its support granted by the Town at its last 
annual meeting. 

Donations have been received during the year as follows : Miss 
E.Walton, 2 vols., State of Massachusetts, 13; South Chelms- 
ford Library, 4 ; Geo. A. Parkhurst, 1 ; New York World, 1 ; 
United States Bureau of Education, 6 ; Prentiss Webster, Esq., 1 ; 



-Civil Service Commission, 1 ; J. Adams Bartlett, 1 ; Rev. H. A. 
Cornell, 4 ; Smithsonian Institute, 3 vols, and a large number of 
pamphlets; Dr. S. A. Green. 2 vols, and 1 document; Miss Sarah 
L. Putnam, 1 vol. and 12 magazines; Miss C. A. Stanley, 13 
magazines ; Hatch Experiment Station, 15 pamphlets. These have 
Jaeen duly acknowledged by the Trustees, with thanks in behalf of 
the Town. 

There have been added by purchase 168 volumes. 

The Trustees can not close this report without expressing their 
great pleasure in anticipation of the occupancy of the new and very 
handsome and commodious Library building now nearly completed 
in this village through the generosity and public spirit of our 
former townsman, Mr. Amos F. Adams of Boston — Messrs. J. A. 
Bartlett and C. E. A. Bartlett also having greatly aided in securing 
for the building a fine location, the former by the donation of a 
valuable piece of land, and the latter b} r grading the land at consid- 
erable expense. Mr. Thomas M. Adams of South Chelmsford has 
also placed in the hands of the Trustees a donation of $500 for the 
purchase of books. 

We are expecting a great increase in the public use of the 
Library through the increased convenience and attractiveness thus to 
be supplied. We are planning for considerably longer hours of open- 
ing and for an increase of facilities for service. The Reading 
Room, a feature we have not hitherto possessed, will no doubt be 
appreciated by the general public as well as b} T ourselves as a most 
valuable and almost indispensable adjunct to the collection of books 
which forms the Library. 

We announce with regret that Miss Louisa A. Allen, after 
having served acceptably for two years as a member of this Board, 
has tendered her resignation. 

The extraordinary expenses of removing and re-arranging the 
present materials of the Library, of preparing for circulation the 
large additions already donated, and for the care and maintenance 
of the building, will call for an additional appropriation for the 
coming year, as follows : 

We recommend, if the Library be maintained under the pres- 
ent conditions, an appropriation of $250 for the coming year ; and 
if the new building be accepted and the Library removed thereto 
an additional appropriation, as above, of $350, or $600 in all. 



6 

STATE OF THE LIBRARY. 

Number of books and documents in the Library 

per report of last year 24477| 

Added by donations, volumes 40 

Added by purchase, volumes 168 208 }| 

2655- 

Destroyed because of infection, volumes ... 6 

Lost and untraceable 1 1 

Present number of volumes and documents 2G4&| 

Net increase for the year 201 

There are, in addition to the above, a large number of unbound' 
magazines and pamphlets and two maps. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Money appropriated by Town $250 00 

Received from fines and sale of catalogues. . 14 08 

Paid for books $164 95 

Miss Nettie Stevens, for arranging 

books and preparing accession list, 12 60 

Harold Davis, for assisting in same. ... 2 50 

for stationery and library cards 9 00 

14 Supplies 6 30 

" Librarian's services 50 00 

A. Heady Park, for transporting books 

to South Chelmsford 13 00 

$258 35 
Unexpended balance o 73 

$264 08 $264 08 



Donation of Thomas Minot Adams in the hands of the 
Trustees, $500.00. 

Respectfully submitted. 

HENRY S. PERHAM, 

MRS. HARRIET M. BARTLETT, 

LUTHER H. SARGENT, 

S. INGERSOLL BRIANT, 

A. HEADY PARK, 

Trustees.